Rear Admiral to Fill Senate Chaplain Role; Will Be First Adventist in That Position

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 18, 2003 | Go to article overview

Rear Admiral to Fill Senate Chaplain Role; Will Be First Adventist in That Position


Byline: Julia Duin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The choice for Senate chaplain will bring many firsts to the position: the first black man, first military chaplain and first Seventh-day Adventist.

Navy Rear Adm. Barry C. Black, 54, once approved by the Senate, will replace retiring Senate chaplain Lloyd C. Ogilvie, a Presbyterian.

The fourth of eight children born in public housing in South Baltimore's Cherry Hill district, Adm. Black's career as an Adventist pastor and military chaplain led him to the Navy's chief of chaplains post three years ago.

"I am excited about this opportunity to provide ministry here at the Senate," he said yesterday . The chaplain was selected by a committee of three Republican and Democratic senators.

"Admiral Black has provided spiritual guidance to thousands of service men and women during his 25 years of service," Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist said yesterday . "Recent world events brought significant challenges to the chief of chaplains, and in every case, Admiral Black's unique perspective and wisdom was a calming and sobering influence."

Asked whether he was trying to make a statement by naming the first black Senate chaplain, the Tennessee Republican replied, "No, absolutely not."

Mr. Frist ascended to the majority leadership position when Sen. Trent Lott, Mississippi Republican, resigned after praising the presidential campaign of former Sen. Strom Thurmond, South Carolina Republican, who ran on a segregationist platform.

Adm. Black will be the 62nd chaplain to accept the two-year post, although many chaplains renew their terms several times. The chaplain oversees the prayers that open all Senate sessions, plus counsels the senators, their families and staffs, and schedules Bible studies and prayer meetings for a constituency of 6,000 people. …

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Rear Admiral to Fill Senate Chaplain Role; Will Be First Adventist in That Position
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