State Confirms Cases of Monkeypox in DuPage

By Kunz, Tona | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 13, 2003 | Go to article overview

State Confirms Cases of Monkeypox in DuPage


Kunz, Tona, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Tona Kunz Daily Herald Staff Writer

The Illinois Department of Public Health confirmed Thursday three suspected cases of monkeypox in DuPage County are in fact the tropical virus.

That brings the number of confirmed cases in Illinois to four with another eight cases listed as probable or suspected. Individuals with visible lesions have been quarantined either in hospitals or homes until the scabs fall off.

All of the Illinois victims had direct contact with a prairie dog infected with the African virus, the easiest way to transmit the disease.

National health officials had downplayed the chance of person- to-person transmission until Wisconsin health officials announced Thursday a health worker may have picked up the virus from an infected patient, the first such instance in the nation. The disease has been known to jump from person to person infrequently in Africa.

Wisconsin state epidemiologist Jeff Davis said the monkeypox virus was not yet confirmed in the worker, who is ill and has been isolated.

Federal health officials have recommended smallpox vaccinations for anyone in contact with infected animals or people or investigating the outbreaks. Vaccinations are effective up to 14 days after exposure. Studies have shown that smallpox vaccination is about 85 percent effective in preventing monkeypox.

But the vaccination recommendation conflicts with earlier directions given to local heath departments by the state.

DuPage County hasn't had anyone seeking the vaccination yet. Even if people come forward for a shot, health officials say they won't administer it until they get some legal and medical questions answered. The state health department, as part of its bioterrorism preparedness plan, has approved the shots only for public health workers, not the general public.

The vaccinations have caused heart attacks in some recipients and come with warnings for people with a variety of ailments including eczema, diabetes, high cholesterol or those planning to get pregnant. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

State Confirms Cases of Monkeypox in DuPage
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.