The Numbers Game

The Evening Standard (London, England), June 20, 2003 | Go to article overview

The Numbers Game


60,000

The number of pints of Pimm's consumed at Wimbledon 2002 along with 312,500 bottles of water plus 14,000 bottles of champagne.

13

The number of countries whose representatives have won the men's singles title. The United States leads the list with 33 winners and is followed by the British Isles (32), Australia (21), France (7), Sweden (7), Germany (4), New Zealand (4), Great Britain (3), Czechoslovakia (1), Egypt (1), Netherlands (1), Spain (1), Croatia (1).

2,032

The number of tennis rackets the Championships stringing team restrung at last year's tournament. It all adds up to nearly 13 miles of string.

Roughly 65 per cent was gut string, 12 per cent hybrid (gut and synthetic) and 23 per cent synthetic gut.

37

The duration in minutes of the shortest men's singles final in history.

Britain's W.C. Renshaw beat compatriot J.T.

Hartley 6-0, 6-1, 6-1 in 1881.

200

The attendance at the first men's singles final, which was won by Spencer Gore in 1877. Admission cost one shilling.

9,373,990

The total amount of prize money in pounds available at this year's Championships. The men's champion will receive [pounds sterling]575,000, a 9.5 per cent increase on last year, while the ladies' champion will pocket [pounds sterling]535,000.

First-round losers in the singles receive [pounds sterling]8,630 and [pounds sterling]6,900 respectively.

17 years, 227 days

The age that Boris Becker became the youngest men's champion in 1985.

144

The mph of the fastest serve fired off by Andy Roddick (USA) at last year's Championships. …

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