The Top Ten. Party Dictators

The Evening Standard (London, England), June 20, 2003 | Go to article overview

The Top Ten. Party Dictators


Nothing says more about the rich and famous than their parties - often dedicated to boosting their own egos, at the expense of their guests-

When it comes to party dictators, Sir Elton John, 56, holds the trump card.

At his ultra-glamorous White Tie and Tiara ball, all the women suffer bridal levels of stress as they get dressed. Even Liz and Posh battle to outsparkle one another and the other A-listers. Last year Elton wore a [pounds sterling]7-million oval ring. Beat that.

When the modest P Diddy, 33, hosted 'The Greatest Party of All Time', he made damn sure that no one let the side down.

Strict instructions on the invitations demanded female guests had 'hairdos, waxing, manicures and pedicures' and 'haircuts, shapeups and clean shaves' for the men.

Last year Bhs billionaire Philip Green, 51, celebrated his 50th birthday in Cyprus with a weekend of bacchanalian largesse, costing [pounds sterling]5 million. Green's need for control extended to demanding his guests' measurements in advance and making them wear made-to-measure togas. There was no escape.

When David and Victoria Beckham, 29 and 28, threw a [pounds sterling]350,000 bash for the NSPCC, they invited businesses to pay [pounds sterling]3,000 a head and let their celebrity friends in free- with one proviso - they had to bid in the auction. The pressure forced Jamie Oliver to pay [pounds sterling]29,000 for some smelly old boots.

She didn't want anyone to spoil her big day so Madonna, 44, locked her wedding guests in Skibo Castle for four days, and banned the use of mobile phones and cameras.

Only wives or girlfriends to whom Madonna had been previously introduced were allowed to attend - she didn't want the single boys using the weekend as a totty hunt. …

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