Unemployment Claims

Economic Trends, November 2002 | Go to article overview

Unemployment Claims


The number of initial claims for unemployment insurance is an important economic indicator because it provides frequent, timely information about the U.S. workforce. This number received a great deal of attention last month, because the four-week moving average exceeded 400,000, which many consider an indicator of recession. Other indicators, however, do not suggest a renewed recession. Even so, the unemployment insurance system provides a wealth of current labor market information.

Trends for continued claims resemble those for initial claims, but are slower to fall during a recovery because several weeks may pass before workers are employed again. After the recessions of 1990-91 and 2001 (which is widely believed to have ended last December), the number of continued claims stayed high for several months before starting to decline. During these so-called "jobless" recoveries, the average duration of unemployment continued to increase long after the recession ended, partly because some states opt to extend the maximum permissible period for claiming benefits, which is typically around 26 weeks. The cur rent average duration, 16.6 weeks, ks the longest since just after the 1981-82 recession.

Absolute measures of unemployment tend to increase as the labor force increases. A better measure of unemployment is the insured unemployment rate (the share of the labor force that claims unemployment benefits), which adjusts for the growth of the labor force. It is lower than the total unemployment rate because some unemployed persons do not qualify, or do not choose to receive benefits. Even under extended-benefit regimes, some workers cannot qualify. because they have been unemployed too long.

Unemployment claims data are compiled from each state into national figures, so they allow one to observe regional differences that may be obscured in sample-based measures like those derived from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' household survey. Some differences between states result from differences in their programs (for example, whether the state extends its benefits), but there are also striking regional differences in conditions. During 2002:IIQ, states that were heavily invested in hightech industries, including the West Coast states, Massachusetts, and New Jersey, posted insured unemployment rates that far exceeded the U.S. average. In the industrial Great Lakes region during the same period, some states did better than the national average and others did worse. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Unemployment Claims
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.