A Profile


WHAT is The Heritage Conservation Society? The HCS is an organization that advocates the protection and preservation of our built heritage, cultural and historical sites and settings. By doing so, the HCS upholds the Philippine Constitution which states that heritage and culture should be developed and preserved for national identity. The HCS is a non-stock, non-profit foundation duly registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Philippine Commission for NGO Certification. It has a representative to the National Commission for Culture and the Arts and the National Historical Institute.

Why conserve heritage? This is about maintaining our links with a common past by preserving significant structures, historical and cultural sites and settings. Our built heritage is evidence of our political history and socio-economic development; it reflects our shared values, is tangible proof of Filipino excellence and creativity. When vestiges of our past are damaged or destroyed, a fragment of our national life is irrevocably lost to future generations.

Far from converting anything heritage into a museum, the HCS affirms that an efficient 21st century lifestyle can take place in the same urban and architectural envelope that was made by earlier generations. Built heritage can be recycled for contemporary, adaptive reuse, thereby preserving the cultural charm and traditional character of our cities and towns. Heritage conservation enhances urban revitalization and community housing, encourages the revival of traditional crafts and stimulates entrepreneurial activities. It awakens a pride of place which arouses cultural and historical awareness. It often advances cultural tourism.

The HCS aims to debunk certain misconceptions about the protection of our national patrimony that it is an esoteric, elitist concern, and an obstacle to progress and modernization.

How does the HCS work? Advocacy is a major activity because the discipline of preservation is relatively new in the Philippines. The HCS works closely with the Local Government Academy which has included heritage issues in its intensive courses for local government officials. The HCS has joined the Philippine Urban Development Forum to make sure that heritage concerns are taken into consideration.

The National Commission for Culture and the Arts, the National Historical Institute, the National Museum of the Filipino People are partners of the HCS because these governmental agencies are mandated to protect our national patrimony. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Profile
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.