The Minister and Her Lies; CHILD SEX ABUSE: AN ANALYSIS OF HOW SHE STILL TRIES TO AVOID BLAME

By Murphy, Joe | The Evening Standard (London, England), July 1, 2003 | Go to article overview

The Minister and Her Lies; CHILD SEX ABUSE: AN ANALYSIS OF HOW SHE STILL TRIES TO AVOID BLAME


Murphy, Joe, The Evening Standard (London, England)


Byline: JOE MURPHY

MARGARET HODGE yesterday tried to blame everyone but herself for the failure of Islington council - which she led - to tackle child abuse.

She even claimed the events took place two decades earlier, and tried to deflect criticism by highlighting the fact that the children in care were "difficult" and traumatised. Here are Mrs Hodge's key claims in a BBC Radio 4 interview - and the dreadful reality she was avoiding responsibility for.

Mrs Hodge

"I think in the Seventies and Eighties, if you look back at that time, there was an enormous lack of understanding of what was happening in children's homes."

In reality

The critical events took place not in the Seventies but in the period from 1990, when Mrs Hodge was warned by social workers that something deeply worrying was happening in Islington, to 1992, when the scandal was finally exposed in an award-winning series of Evening Standard articles.

Mrs Hodge

"I think there was a deep lack of understanding by myself, by social services, by policy makers, by all of us as to the state of what was happening in children's homes."

In reality

The big child abuse scandals in the Eighties - from the Orkneys to Cleveland and Rochdale - meant councils were well aware by 1990 of the appalling nature of the problem.

Moreover, the exposure of Frank Beck, the Leicestershire care home operator, in 1990 revealed how abusers could ingratiate themselves with local authorities to avoid suspicion. Mrs Hodge should have been alert to such dangers and the need to question the judgment of senior officers.

Mrs Hodge

"Whenever an allegation of something going wrong was brought to me we investigated it, including of course the allegations that were brought to us by the Standard."

In reality

Mrs Hodge dismissed the Evening Standard's detailed accounts of victims' stories in 1992 as "a sensationalist piece of gutter journalism". It is now claimed she was warned 2 1/2 years earlier of serious concerns of a major problem at Islington. She has never apologised for dismissing the Standard reports but in February 1992, after an official inquiry vindicated this newspaper's journalism, she conceded: "You were right that there was abuse in the children's homes." She added: "I was completely misled. If you had been in the same situation, with confidence in your senior officers, what would you have done?"

When it was pointed out she repeated false claims that children were paid for information, she replied: "I didn't know that but that was what I was told. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Minister and Her Lies; CHILD SEX ABUSE: AN ANALYSIS OF HOW SHE STILL TRIES TO AVOID BLAME
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.