Hunting Ban Vote Pure `Class Warfare'

The Journal (Newcastle, England), July 3, 2003 | Go to article overview

Hunting Ban Vote Pure `Class Warfare'


Monday night's vote for an outright ban on foxhunting, by a huge majority in the House of Commons, was pure and unadulterated "class warfare" born out of ignorance and envy. Willy Poole's column should be worth reading this week.

With the railways in a shambles, education going down the plughole, the NHS showing no signs of improvement regardless of how much taxpayers' money is thrown at it and immigration and asylum policy completely out of control, what is this government's priority? You've guessed it: "gay rights" and "foxhunting".

Both serve as useful diversions for the media from the real issue, which is: why did we go to war on the basis of a "dodgy dossier" and a "sexed up" report on the elusive weapons of mass destruction in Iraq?

As for Alastair Campbell's tirade against the BBC for merely reporting the facts - a classic case of shooting the messenger if ever there was one.

John S Pearson

Two sides in hunting row not comparable

YOU rightly say (The Journal, editorial, July 2) that one side or the other will be left feeling bitter and angry if the hunting ban is made law.

Yet the two sides are not comparable, because only one is trying to impose its own cultural values on the other.

When I last checked, the hunters were not trying to make hunting compulsory.

Surely, we should have stopped trying to inflict our own notion of "civilisation" on other people when we gave up the

AM Mitchell,

Will campaigners pay for fencing foxholes?

THERE were no objections to killing insects, which were a problem for the human race.

Will the anti-fox hunt campaigners pay for fencing the foxholes, feed and care, or will they run wild, giving compensation for lost stock and many jobs for countrymen?

NAME AND ADDRESS SUPPLIED.

Assembly would be able to assess needs

I WAS glad that Rodney Atkinson pointed to the failure of previous British Government policy in respect of regional aid.

That is exactly why we need a democratic and accountable regional tier of government.

A directly-elected regional assembly will be able to assess regional needs as a whole, decide priorities and allocate resources accordingly.

Throwing money at the North- East - even if it is less in terms of pounds per head than Scotland and Wales - has been a failure. …

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Hunting Ban Vote Pure `Class Warfare'
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