Museum Draws on Legacy of 'Peanuts'

By Astor, Dave | Editor & Publisher, June 16, 2003 | Go to article overview

Museum Draws on Legacy of 'Peanuts'


Astor, Dave, Editor & Publisher


Visitors get insights into Charles M. Schulz's life and work

Happiness is a warm ... Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center.

"We wanted a homey feel," said Jeannie Schulz, speaking to E&P outside the low-key building here that commemorates her late husband and his "Peanuts" comic.

Inside the 27,384-foot museum are such things as a timeline of Schulz's life (1922-2000), his childhood glasses, a German helmet he kept as a World War II souvenir, his many awards, family photos, licensed products, ads using "Peanuts" characters, early promotional material from United Feature Syndicate, pre-comic sketches, and a look at "Peanuts" in different languages (it's called "Radishes" in Denmark and "Small Fry" in Holland).

On the museum's walls, visitors can see two Yoshiteru Otani creations: a 7,000-pound wooden sculpture of Snoopy morphing into his various personas, and a 17-by-22-foot tile mosaic on which 3,588 "Peanuts" comic images outline Charlie Brown trying to kick that football held by Lucy. Upstairs, there's an entire nursery-room wall transported from a Colorado Springs house -- where Schulz lived briefly during the early 1950s -- covered by art the cartoonist painted for his daughter Meredith. Even the museum's bathroom walls feature "Peanuts" strips.

Then there's a re-creation of Schulz's studio, which had been located a few minutes from the museum site when the cartoonist was alive. …

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Museum Draws on Legacy of 'Peanuts'
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