Information Is (Almost) Everything: With Aid Complexities Multiplying, Getting Financial Aid Info to the Students and Families Who Need It Most Is Now Critical. (Student Finance)

By Angelo, Jean Marie | University Business, July 2003 | Go to article overview

Information Is (Almost) Everything: With Aid Complexities Multiplying, Getting Financial Aid Info to the Students and Families Who Need It Most Is Now Critical. (Student Finance)


Angelo, Jean Marie, University Business


Navigating the financial aid application process is intimidating for most. So, imagine what it is like for the neediest students--those who enter the process with no college savings account and, most likely, no parent or family member who has ever been a college applicant.

These students are the ones who need aid the most, yet they make up the cohort of applicant that is often the least informed about the financial aid application process.

Information Divide. A 2003 Harris Poll, commissioned by The Sallie Mae Fund (www.thesalliemaefund.org), revealed that 45 percent of parents surveyed with incomes less than $25,000 per year have "no idea" how they will pay for college. Minority families also indicated they need more information--66 percent of black parents and 62 percent of Hispanic parents said they did not have enough information, versus 44 percent of white parents. Complicating the issue: The neediest students often become aware of financial aid information a good two years after students with greater financial resources.

In the effort to get crucial financial aid information to the families who need it most, Sallie Mae teamed up with the National Association for College Admission Counseling (www.nacac.com), for Project Access. The project has a number of informational components, including regional workshops on financial aid, booklets, a Web site, and a toll-free number that leads to more resources. There are even scholarships available. Still, only time will tell if a program such as this one can even make a dent in the problem.

Cleaning up the act with SOAP. Start with young students, urges Judith Lewis Logue, director of Financial Aid at the University of San Diego and the chair of the CAL SOAP (California Student Opportunity and Access Program) advisory committee (on the Web at www.sandiegocalsoao.com). SOAP is 24 years old and was founded with the sole purpose of helping students who don't have easy access to higher education. Educators and administrators based at 16 schools and locations throughout California, are constantly on the lookout for low-income students who would be first-generation college students. SOAP begins at the fourth-grade level by arranging for youngsters to visit college campuses and even sit in on some classes. By the time these students reach sixth grade, SOAP is targeting their parents and extended families by selling them on the value of higher education, "Once the parents are convinced, they support the students studying hard and getting good grades," says Logue, adding that students and their families soon become more mindful about the types of courses needed to get into college.

High school students tapped for the SOAP program are constantly apprised of deadlines for tests and academic and financial applications. Perhaps the most powerful component is SOAP's reentering program, which matches up high school seniors with college students who made it to a higher education via SOAR These students meet with their younger peers to go over applications and college info. …

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