Vive Les Anglo-Saxons

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 18, 2003 | Go to article overview

Vive Les Anglo-Saxons


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

There would appear to be some value to the thousand-year tradition of English liberty. Apparently that tradition imbues its leaders with an instinct to mount the barricades when liberty is threatened. Yesterday, British Prime Minister Tony Blair, standing in the well of the House of Representatives - the same place where stood, so long ago, Winston Churchill - commanded the Queen's English to powerful effect as he put the current petty bickering, partisan sniping and media cavilling in the profound context of our civilization's desperate struggle to defeat worldwide terrorism.

The House chamber, that has heard so many state-of-the-nation addresses over the centuries, heard yesterday a state-of-the-world address. And a perilous state it is. Mr. Blair reminded the assembled leaders of our government that September 11 was only a tragic prologue to a continuing struggle, of which the Iraq war is only an early round. In a stinging, if oblique, reference to the current foolish debate over uranium in Africa, the British prime minister observed that history's judgment on us would be harsh indeed if we had hesitated in the face of world danger, for want of evidence beyond a reasonable doubt.

Especially useful to be heard by many members of Congress, who are currently haggling over inconsequential matters, was his reminder that despite our material abundance, we are uniquely vulnerable to the fanatical violence that hovers in the "shadows and darkness" of the terrorist-ridden world. …

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