Town Mourns Passing of Fund-Raising Flapjack King

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 17, 2003 | Go to article overview

Town Mourns Passing of Fund-Raising Flapjack King


Byline: Rhonda Sciarra

Geneva mourned the loss of a community pillar and champion pancake-maker this week.

Harlan "Harp" Lundgren, who flipped flapjacks for dozens of years at the United Methodist Church's annual Memorial Day breakfast, died at his Geneva home Saturday from natural causes, family said. He was 78.

Lundgren, also a police and fire commissioner since 2001, was active with the church choir, the men's club and the Geneva Lions Club.

Police cars surrounded the United Methodist Church Tuesday at Lundgren's funeral. Everyone at the Geneva police station loved Harp, police officers said.

"He has been instrumental in forming the police department with their new hires," said police Lt. Joe Frega. "Beyond that, he is a wonderful human being ... He loved coming in, and he always had to come in, shake my hand and ask how things were going. He is going to missed by everybody here."

Lundgren was hospitalized this Memorial Day and missed out on his pancake post. He had served up sausages and mixed batter since the first breakfast 50 years ago. The only facet of the breakfast he didn't take part in was taking money or tickets.

He was known for the pancakes.

"When they get golden brown - that's when the people like them," he said when he was asked about his technique earlier this year.

"They don't like them pale and light, or cremated and burnt. You have to get it just right."

Pottery on parade: Geneva's Down to Earth Pottery will have an open house the first Thursday of each month. The next open house on plates and platters will be from 6 to 9 p. …

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Town Mourns Passing of Fund-Raising Flapjack King
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