It's Not Children Behaving Badly, It's the Parents

By Hitchens, Peter | The Mail on Sunday (London, England), July 27, 2003 | Go to article overview

It's Not Children Behaving Badly, It's the Parents


Hitchens, Peter, The Mail on Sunday (London, England)


Byline: PETER HITCHENS

SURELY, it must be wrong to give mind altering drugs to small children.

Future generations will record with horror and disgust the use of Ritalin to control tens of thousands of boys and girls in our era.

The tablet itself is so potent that drug-dealers have been offering children toys and CDs in exchange for it.

In Chicago's squalid South Side, drug-abusers inject it on its own or with heroin or cocaine.

Yet more than 250,000 small children are now being dosed with this pill, some of them only 18 months old. It is the official 'treatment' for the portentouslynamed Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), an invented disease.

In one school in Scotland, 80 of the 380 pupils are said to have been prescribed these pills. But the disorder is not in the children. It is in our anti-child society. It is the grownups who are not paying attention.

The children are ' hyperactive' because they are puzzled, abandoned and unhappy. From the moment babies are born, their parents are under pressure to neglect them or to expose them to horrible influences.

Mothers are told they are worthless if they do not rush back to work and leave their babies in the care of others.

The Government believes that mothers who stay at home, despite the heavy financial cost, are a 'problem'.

TINY children, who are designed to learn to be fully human from as much contact with their mothers as possible, are instead dumped in 'childcare' where they spend most of their time in the company of other tiny children. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

It's Not Children Behaving Badly, It's the Parents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.