Bookshelf


Abortion in the Ancient World by Konstantinos Kapparis (Duckworth, 2002, 264pp.) One for the historians: a fascinating survey of the reasons for and debates around abortion in ancient Greece and Rome.

Agony In the Garden: Sex, Lies and Redemption from the Troubled Heart of the American Catholic Church by John van der Zee (Thunder's Mouth Press, 2002, 275pp.) The sobering story of the diocese of Santa Rosa, California, revealing financial and moral duplicity of the highest order.

The American Religious Debate Over Birth Control, 1907-1937 by Kathleen A. Tobin (McFarland, 2001, 226pp.) A comprehensive examination of the clash over the morality of artificial contraception in religious circles during the early part of the 20th century, with useful reflections on the cultural background against which the debate took place.

Articulating Life's Memory: US Medical Rhetoric about Abortion in the Nineteenth Century by Nathan Stormer (Lexington, 2002, 233pp.) Another one for those with an interest in historical debates over abortion, this is an absorbing look at the manner in which antiabortion rhetoric during the 19th century focused on alleged threats to the racial integrity of the US.

Better than Well: American Medicine Meets the American Dream by Carl Elliot (W. W. Norton, 2003, 357pp.) A fascinating account of what drives Americans towards self-improvement, including a bioethical perspective on interventions before and after birth.

Catholics, Politics, & Public Policy: Beyond Left and Right by Clarke E. Cochran and David Carroll Cochran (Orbis, 2003, 210pp.) Two academics look at contemporary social issues, especially as they relate to Catholic social teachings and Catholic voters.

The Clash of Orthodoxies: Law, Religion and Morality in Crisis by Robert R George (Intercollegiate Studies Institute, 2001, 399pp.) A conservative challenge to the concept that "secularist orthodoxy" represents the triumph of reason, from a member of the Presidential Council on Bioethics, who makes the case for the superiority of "Christian moral teaching."

Feminist Perspectives on Pastoral Theology by Zoe Bennett Moore (Pilgrim Press, 2002, 157pp.) An excellent overview of available literature, this is one in a series of introductory guides to feminist theology.

Hellfire Nation: The Politics of Sin in American History by James A. Morone (Yale University Press, 2003, 575pp.) A lively and informative study on the importance of religion and sin to the evolution of the American state.

The Idea of a Catholic University by George Dennis O'Brien (University of Chicago Press, 2002, 239pp.) An engaging and even-handed exploration of the "fundamental clash between Catholic faith and the modern university."

The Liberation of the Laity: In Search of an Accountable Church by Paul Lakeland (Continuum, 2003, 311pp.) A radical call for fundamental changes in the ministry of the Catholic church.

The Mobilization of Shame: A World View of Human Rights by Robert F. Drinan, SJ (Yale University Press, 2002, 240pp.) A brief history of the human rights movement since World War II, by a noted and unflinching advocate of an international system that respects the rights of all.

No Women in Holy Orders? The Women Deacons of the Early Church by John Wijngaards (Canterbury Press, 2002, 222pp.) A definitive and captivating historical overview of women deacons in the Catholic church.

Nothing Sacred: Women Respond to Religious Fundamentalism and Terror edited by Betsy Reed (Thunder's Mouth Press, 2002, 433pp.) A collection of feminist responses to contemporary manifestations of fundamentalism, from the Taliban in Afghanistan to the Catholic church's role at the UN and the anti-abortion movement in the United States. …

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