New Bills Introduced to Require Alcohol Warnings on Advertising

The Alcoholism Report, March 1991 | Go to article overview

New Bills Introduced to Require Alcohol Warnings on Advertising


NEW BILLS INTRODUCED TO REQUIRE ALCOHOL WARNINGS ON ADVERTISING

A major drive to require rotating health and safety warnings on alcoholic beverage advertising was renewed as a bipartisan group of Senators and House members introduced the 1991 Sensible Advertising and Family Education (SAFE) Act.

The effort was kicked off at a Capitol Hill news conference where the primary sponsors -- Sen. Strom Thurmond (R-SC) and Rep. Joe Kennedy (D-MA) -- were joined by other lawmakers and representatives of groups belonging to the Coalition on Alcohol Advertising & Family Education in calling for action on the SAFE measure. Similar legislation was introduced in the last Congress (AR, April, '90).

Thurmond introduced the Senate bill (S-664) on March 14, while Kennedy dropped the companion House measure (HR-1443) into the hopper the same day. Joining Thurmond was Sen. Albert Gore (D-TN) with other Senators reportedly ready to sign on as co-sponsors. The House bill was co-sponsored by Reps. John R. Kasich (R-OH), Constance Morella (R-MD), Nicholas Mavroules (D-MA), Mary Rose Oakar (D-OH), Wayne Owens (D-UT), George Miller (D-CA), John Conyers (D-MI), Bill Orton (D-UT), Ron De Lugo (D-VI), Barney Frank (D-MA), Doug Bereuter (R-NE), William Lehman (D-FL), and Ben Jones (D-GA).

Under the bill, all alcoholic beverage advertising, including radio and television blurbs, would be required to carry one of five health and safety warning messages on a rotating basis one year after enactment. As spelled out in the legislation, the messages would include:

1. SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Drinking during pregnancy may cause mental retardation and other birth defects. Avoid alcohol during pregnancy.

2. WARNING: Alcohol impairs your ability to drive a car or operate machinery.

3. WARNING: Alcohol may be hazardous if you are using any other drugs such as over-the-counter, prescription, or illicit drugs.

4. WARNING: Drinking alcohol may become addictive.

5. WARNING: It's against the law to purchase alcohol for persons under age 21.

For print advertising and promotional materials, the messages would include information on a toll-free 1-800 number, to be established and operated by HHS, for callers to get more information and resources. Broadcast commercials would have the warning message read, and for television, a graphic representation of the warning message must be included in each advertisement as the warning is read. The Federal Trade Commission would be responsible for developing regulation for carrying out the law. Advertisers would develop plans for FTC approval, describing how they would rotate the messages in their ads.

Kennedy said the SAFE Act would "counteract the millions of dollars of misleading alcohol advertising that Americans are inundated with every year -- advertising that promotes the glamour of alcohol use with no mention of its consequences."

Thurmond told the news conference that "alcohol advertising is the single greatest source of alcohol education for Americans, and rarely does it encourage them to consider the consequences of drinking."

Among other statements of strong support, Rep. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Bills Introduced to Require Alcohol Warnings on Advertising
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.