As Wi-Fi Service Expands, Debate Centers on Covering the Costs

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 11, 2003 | Go to article overview

As Wi-Fi Service Expands, Debate Centers on Covering the Costs


Byline: Andrew Wang Medill News Service

It may seem an odd association, but a Starbucks coffee shop on Michigan Ave. and a 42-block area of St. Louis have one thing in common.

Both are public "hot spots" - the increasingly prevalent places where anyone with a wireless fidelity-enabled device can be connected to the Internet without a wire.

If these disparate locales have Wi-Fi in common, though, a key distinction separates them: who's covering the costs?

As this developing technology moves toward mainstream acceptance, there's debate about who should pay.

At one end of the spectrum, the expenses are passed on to the end user as monthly usage charges. At the other end, third parties - a city government trying to revitalize downtown, hotels and restaurants trying to draw customers, or, as many in the industry are predicting, advertisers trying to penetrate a new medium - are footing the bill and allowing Internet surfers to log on free of charge.

To log on to a wireless network, users need a wireless card on their laptops or PDAs. Many newer laptops come with the hardware pre-installed, but aftermarket cards are widely available for less than $100.

For paid service, users also need a subscription to a wireless Internet service provider, which typically costs $30 to $50 per month.

Some companies are betting that consumers will open their wallets for Wi-Fi.

"Definitely I use it frequently enough to justify having it. It really depends on the needs of the person," said Jeff Zabin, an author and vice president of a marketing firm in Chicago who pays $29.95 per month for T-Mobile Wi-Fi access.

"I tell people my office is a soft, cushy chair at Starbucks or Borders."

T-Mobile USA Inc. operates about 2,700 hot spots nationwide, mostly at Starbucks coffee shops and Borders bookstores. Boingo Wireless Inc., Wayport Inc., Verizon Communications Inc. and AT&T Wireless Services Inc. all offer access at comparable rates and have partnerships with businesses in high-traffic areas.

Estimates show that there are currently between 2.5 and 5 million Wi-Fi users. In total, the country has about 5,000 public hot spots.

Wi-Fi has made inroads in the corporate world, especially with business travelers who relish the convenience of instant access to e-mail and digital information at airports, hotels and convention centers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

As Wi-Fi Service Expands, Debate Centers on Covering the Costs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.