TIME TUNNEL: Queen of Sheba's Camel Got the Hump; . . . A JOURNEY INTO OUR RICH HERITAGE

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), August 16, 2003 | Go to article overview

TIME TUNNEL: Queen of Sheba's Camel Got the Hump; . . . A JOURNEY INTO OUR RICH HERITAGE


Byline: David McGrory

features always bring a big response from readers, so this week DAVID McGRORY looks through his varied postbag.

READERS of Time Tunnel are constantly sending me memories of the old days and occasionally I need to share them with you all, so here is a selection.

The feature on the 1936 Godiva Procession (June 7) revived many memories, including these from Evelyn Griffin, of Earlsdon Street, who wrote: "In 1936 the theme was Famous Women in History. In those days Coventry wasn't short of factories and all of them presented a tableau representing different scenes. I worked at Renold and Coventry Chain Company, and we decided on the Queen of Sheba, hence the camel mentioned in Time Tunnel.

"One brave girl volunteered to take the lead and had a practice the day before on 'Daisy' the camel. She was borrowed from the film studios at Elstree, as were our costumes, which were beautiful. They consisted of heavily embroidered tunics and satin trousers and yashmaks for us dancing maidens.

"There were colourful costumes for the boys. I was almost 16 and thought it all hilarious, especially when Daisy decided to tread gently between the crowds and attack the leaves along the route by the Grove."

Evelyn continues: "Our Queen of Sheba managed to finish the afternoon and parade on Daisy. It was a wonderful day and the park was packed for the evening's entertainment."

A gentleman and a scholar

WINIFRED WYLEY was taken back more than 70 years after reading the feature on Narrow Lane (July 12) and seeing the photograph of the 1926 old scholars' association.

She wrote: "I well remember the photograph being taken and can name a few. On the first row are Alice Watson, Jenny Frogatt, Ernie Rowe; teachers, Mr Fife, Mr Eades (headmaster), Miss Dodd and, I think, Elsie Porter.

Behind are Hilda Gough, Ruth Pease, Gladys Martin, her brother, I think, Stanley, Violet Lee, Maggie Abbot, Ida Godsell and myself, Winnie Toy (standing behind Miss Dodd in the dark dress). I wonder how many survive?"

Of Mr Eades, Winifred recalls: "He was a very good headmaster and Mr Fife a great teacher (to us girls anyway), although I think he was quite strict with the boys. Miss Dodd I remember as strict too. Alice Watson was my friend, but not long after leaving school she was taken ill and passed away."

EDITORIAL additions of "Foleshill" to captions in the Narrow Lane feature made it seem as if the lane was in Foleshill. However, it lies mostly within the parish bounds of Radford, with only a small length at the top and bottom in Foleshill.

Happy days among the flowers and horses

THE Time Tunnel about local historian J B Shelton (July 5) regarding Little Park Street and Cow Lane brought a response from Mrs Twyneham, of Kenpas Highway, Styvechale, who wanted to reveal the fate of 66 Little Park Street, which had survived the Blitz.

She wrote: "My husband's parents kept the florist and vegetable shop at number 66. His parents lived with his grandparents in the Chantries, but my husband spent most of his time at no 66 helping to make the wreaths and bouquets. My husband inherited no 66 when his grandparents died and signed it over to his mother, who had to sell it to the council as it was part of the land needed for the building of the police station."

GRACE ROBINSON, of Longfellow Road, Stoke, spent her childhood at the George Inn in Little Park Street. …

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