Challenging Beijing's Iron Fist: Hong Kong Residents Stage Continuing Massive Protests against Red China's Planned Clampdown on Freedom

The New American, August 11, 2003 | Go to article overview

Challenging Beijing's Iron Fist: Hong Kong Residents Stage Continuing Massive Protests against Red China's Planned Clampdown on Freedom


On July 1st, an estimated half-million demonstrators poured into the streets of Hong Kong's central business district for a mass protest outside the Legislative Council. The demonstrations have continued, protesting against government plans to limit freedom of expression and association. Dissatisfaction with the government of Mr. Tung Cheehwa, Hong Kong's chief executive, has been growing ever since the former British colony was handed over to Communist China in 1997. However, Mr. Tung, a puppet of the Beijing regime, stirred this wealthy island enclave of 6.6 million people to action with a proposed new "anti-subversion" bill that most residents see as a major step toward adopting the totalitarian police-state measures in place on the mainland.

Tung first unveiled the new proposal, known as Article 23, last September. Promoted at the insistence of the Peoples' Republic of China (PRC). the law would provide a legal justification for outlawing political dissent and religious worship under the guise of protecting the state against treason, sedition, subversion, or secession. Hong Kong residents are justifiably alarmed that the legislation will be interpreted to make it illegal for them to criticize government policies or to have any contact with religious and political groups outlawed on the mainland. They also are justified in seeing this as a step toward eventual implementation of Communist-style persecution, such as the PRC now employs against the Falun Gong spiritual group, the Roman Catholic Church, and most Protestant churches.

Tung, a shipping tycoon long beholden to Beijing, was chosen as chief executive by a PRC-appointed committee of 800 people. The same committee, dominated by businesses with ties to the mainland, also chooses six members of the 60-member parliament, known as the Legislative Council. An additional 30 members of the legislature are selected by Beijing-designated business and professional groups. That leaves only 24 members for the general public to elect. Besides protesting the proposed Article 23, the demonstrators, representing a broad cross-section of Hong Kong's population, have called on the government to address this democratic deficit.

Following the massive show of public opposition to Article 23. the Tung government postponed adoption of the measure. However, it has indicated that it will not move to speed reforms allowing for popular representation. Tung and the PRC are insisting that no change in the Basic Law, Hong Kong's Communist-designed constitution, take place before the 2007 election for chief executive. Since the chief executive's term of office is five years, this would guarantee a pro-Beijing leader in charge of Hong Kong through 2012 and greatly aid the Communists in consolidating control over the independent-minded people of Hong Kong.

The U.S. State Department and the Bush administration have made virtually no comments about the situation in Hong Kong, even though the demonstrations and the push to enact Article 23 have coincided with the State Department's release of its annual report on human rights around the world. State Department spokesmen condemned human rights violations by Burma, Zimbabwe, and Liberia's Charles Taylor, but carefully avoided making any similar condemnations of Communist China. To the contrary, the PRC, which systematically represses and abuses all human rights, continues to benefit from generous U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Challenging Beijing's Iron Fist: Hong Kong Residents Stage Continuing Massive Protests against Red China's Planned Clampdown on Freedom
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.