Bremer Rules in Iraq: The Same Insider Network That First Built Up Saddam Hussein, and Then Used U.S. Military Power to Topple His Regime, Has Put One of Its Own in Charge of Rebuilding Iraq

By Mass, Warren | The New American, August 11, 2003 | Go to article overview

Bremer Rules in Iraq: The Same Insider Network That First Built Up Saddam Hussein, and Then Used U.S. Military Power to Topple His Regime, Has Put One of Its Own in Charge of Rebuilding Iraq


Mass, Warren, The New American


On June 29th, the guest on the BBC Sunday morning news program Breakfast With Frost could not have been more blunt:

   We are going to fight them and impose
   our will on them and we will
   capture or, if necessary, kill them until
   we have imposed law and order on
   this country.

The speaker was L. Paul Bremer III, the American civilian administrator of Iraq. Former Ambassador Bremer received his assignment on May 6th, when President Bush announced his appointment as "Presidential Envoy to Iraq" to serve as the senior coalition official in that sad and beleaguered nation. In that capacity, Bremer "will oversee Coalition reconstruction efforts and the process by which the Iraqi people build the institutions and governing structures that will guide their future," explained a White House press release. "Ambassador Bremer will report to Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld and will advise the President, through the Secretary, on policies designed to achieve American and Coalition goals for Iraq."

"American and Coalition goals for Iraq"? As decided by whom? The answer to that question lies in the usual Insider institutions with which the new overseer of Iraq is affiliated.

From 1989 through 2000, Bremer was the chief operating officer of Kissinger Associates (KA). A member of the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), Bremer joined the Kissinger group after 23 years of service in the U.S. Diplomatic Corps under six secretaries of state. In 1983, Bremer was named U.S. ambassador to the Netherlands, and, in 1986, President Reagan appointed him ambassador-at-large for counter-terrorism. In 1999, Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert appointed Bremer as chairman of the National Commission on Terrorism.

THE NEW AMERICAN for July 17, 2000 noted: "The June 5th report of the National Commission on Terrorism 'raises questions about how long Americans can remain free of a ghastly police state,' opined left-wing commentator Carl Rowan in his June 7th syndicated column. To deal with the threat of terrorism, the report demands 'a substantial surrender of [individual] freedoms and ... protections against the state,' Rowan summarizes."

One would think that, considering the urgency with which the Bush administration dismantled Saddam Hussein's regime, some mention of Iraq as a potential "terrorist state" would have been made in the National Commission on Terrorism report published only three years ago. Do "rogue regimes" spring up overnight? We might also presume that Mr. Bremer's present position within Iraq implies some extraordinary knowledge concerning the nation. Oddly, Iraq under Saddam Hussein is conspicuous by its absence from the report.

It is curious that the man who bears the single greatest responsibility for the report has been chosen to administer a vanquished "foe" not even identified as a threat three years ago. That does not mean, however, that Ambassador Bremer has not crossed paths with other Insiders who have had more than passing interest in Iraq. He has--the most notable example being his association with Kissinger Associates.

Kissinger Associates

As THE NEW AMERICAN reported last January 13th: "[Dr. Henry] Kissinger created his consulting firm during the mid-1980s in collaboration with Brent Scowcroft and Lawrence Eagleburger. The firm gives secret high-level briefings to an equally secretive list of clients. Essentially a form of matchmaking between foreign rulers and private corporate and banking interests, KA briefing sessions are conducted orally, with nothing committed to paper."

When Kissinger stepped down from his short-lived position as head of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks, he wrote a letter, dated December 13, 2002, to President Bush explaining his resignation. Therein, Dr. Kissinger demonstrated a reluctance to have Kissinger Associates involved in controversy: "It is clear that, although specific potential conflicts can be resolved . …

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Bremer Rules in Iraq: The Same Insider Network That First Built Up Saddam Hussein, and Then Used U.S. Military Power to Topple His Regime, Has Put One of Its Own in Charge of Rebuilding Iraq
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