Audit Uncovers Illegal Immigrants; Social Security Numbers Proved False

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 24, 2003 | Go to article overview

Audit Uncovers Illegal Immigrants; Social Security Numbers Proved False


Byline: Audrey Hudson, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Canton, Miss., has been awfully quiet in the past few weeks, thanks largely to the Social Security Administration, according to Sheriff Toby Trowbridge.

"It's been a ghost town down at the trailer park," the Madison County sheriff said last week.

The Social Security Administration notified Peco Foods Inc. that the Social Security numbers of at least 200 employees were not valid, and the company let the workers go earlier this month.

Sheriff Trowbridge threatened to arrest the laid-off workers who lived in the Westside Trailer Park next to the plant on suspicion of being illegal immigrants. Since then, however, most of them have disappeared, he said.

"They are illegal, and they were going to have to go on to someplace else, whether it's back to Mexico or just move on," the sheriff said. "We were having trouble with illegals in the community for a long time before this came about."

The SSA issued 900,000 similar warnings, or "No Match" letters, to companies nationwide last year. This was a record for the agency.

But this year, after an outcry from immigration groups, SSA is cutting to 130,000 the number of such warnings it will send and dropping threatening language that warned of fines against companies for providing incorrect numbers.

The letters caused "tens of thousands of workers to lose their jobs over the last six to eight years, contributed to a climate of fear and repression in immigrant communities, and caused employers widespread confusion," according to the National Immigration Law Center.

SSA spokesman Mark Lassiter said the reduction in warnings this year is not in response to complaints from employers and employees. "We are just trying to balance the use of our resources versus the cost of sending letters out and based on the volume of corrections," he said.

Mr. Lassiter could not give the number of corrections employers had provided last year and said only that "the percentage of corrections was very low."

Since 1937, the SSA has deposited unclaimed payroll tax money into a special fund, which, according to the agency's inspector general, grew to $374 billion in 2000.

There are an estimated 8 million illegal aliens in the country, but there are no figures on how many are employed, said a spokesman for the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Peco's employees in Mississippi were not questioned about their legal status but were told to resolve the mismatch with the SSA to keep their jobs, the company said in a written statement to The Washington Times.

Some employees "immediately ceased coming to work, while others worked up until the deadline," the company said. "Apparently, none of the affected employees who were asked to contact the SSA did, in fact, do so, as none of those individuals returned ... with any explanation as to why the discrepancy in the Social Security information existed."

Peco also said that "employees were not terminated ... for any reason related to their legal status in this country." Instead, the "sole reason" they were fired "was the refusal of the employees to carry out the company's instructions to them that they contact the SSA and present the company with some explanation as to why there was a discrepancy between the information maintained in the company's files and the information maintained by the SSA. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Audit Uncovers Illegal Immigrants; Social Security Numbers Proved False
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.