Letter: Give Me Justice and Peace over War Any Day

The Birmingham Post (England), September 4, 2003 | Go to article overview

Letter: Give Me Justice and Peace over War Any Day


Byline: MARK OLEY Citizens Advocate CARE -Citizen advocacy, research & education Erdington Birmingham

Dear Editor, -I feel compelled to respond to the assertions by Dr Warson, 'Israeli occupation of the West Bank not illegal' (Post, Aug 26).

These are assertions that not only stretch reality beyond breaking point but, equally, contain therein a dangerous and brutal understanding of international law. In sum, it is a view that 'might is right' and that human rights are worthless.

I wish to address four narrow points that he raises in defence of Israeli policy, and on these ground only. One, that the Israeli occupation of the West Bank is not illegal. Two, that international law permits the gaining of territory. Three, that 'Arab' states have broken UN resolutions. Four, that the Palestinian population has been historically 'small' and the country 'unoccupied.'

In respect of the first assertion; since 1967 Israel has consistently violated international law in pursuance of an expansionist policy into the occupied territories -always with the support of the US and the use of it's veto, therefore consigning international law and justice to the rubbish bin. That's why they are called the occupied territories: occupation is illegal under international law and conventions. So, for example, on December 14, 2001, the UN debated a resolution condemning violence on the ground and supporting the establishment of an international monitoring mechanism. The resolution failed to pass as a result of a US veto. Further, the UN Security Council passed five resolutions on the situation in Israel and the occupied territories from January to November 2002. All have been ignored by Israel. Is Dr Warson in support of states and Government's breaking such laws? If so, what does he therefore support? The rule of force and barbarism?

Addressing Dr Warson's assertion that 'force gains territory', would he have held this view over the 1939 invasion of Poland and the Easter European states by the Nazi? …

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