The Launch of a New Jihad

By Lambon, Tim | New Statesman (1996), August 25, 2003 | Go to article overview

The Launch of a New Jihad


Lambon, Tim, New Statesman (1996)


The somnambulant address in the afternoon heat of the press conference broke off. The roar of a very big explosion assaulted the small audience of journalists and cameramen and the lights went out. A few people screamed. Someone started shouting: "Stay where you are! Stay where you are ..."

In the dim daylight filtering through the pall of dust, the United Nations headquarters in Baghdad was a scene of shock and confusion. People caked in grime and blood wandered aimlessly. Those unhurt ran to help, desperately pulling the dead and injured from the wreckage.

This was the arrival statement of a new player in the Iraqi struggle. It was the first suicide bombing since the fall of Saddam Hussein, and against a soft target that is not seen by Iraqis as being part of the occupation. Talking to people in Baghdad, it becomes apparent that the genesis of the violence in Iraq is now diverse. It seems the country is the new front line of the jihad that started, in the modern era, in 1979, with the invasion of Afghanistan by the Soviet Union. Then, the west backed the jihadis, the young men such as Osama Bin Laden who flocked to the training camps of Pakistan's North-West Frontier Province to fight against the Soviet army. But the mujahedin, as we later found out, were fighting for Islam, not for the west.

That war cannot be ignored in considering Iraq. A non-Muslim superpower invades an Islamic nation for strategic gain. After the initial confusion, Islamic resistance builds and a guerrilla war ensues. What started as random acts of violence against occupying troops has become a campaign with the clear objective of destabilising the country and forcing the Americans to leave. This involves not just an increasing number of body bags shipped Stateside, but a daily death toll among innocent Iraqis and the disruption of essential services, both of which serve increasingly to politicise and radicalise the population. …

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