Events to Honor Prisoners, Missing Soldiers

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 16, 2003 | Go to article overview

Events to Honor Prisoners, Missing Soldiers


Byline: Kristie Benedik

National Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Recognition Day is Friday.

Our local observance, hosted by the Carpentersville Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5915, will be held at 6:30 p.m. Friday at the Veterans Memorial Garden located on the west side of Carpenter Park.

This is the 15th ceremony hosted by the post that invites about 15 other posts and auxiliaries from the 5th District and all area residents to attend.

Jack Hosey, a Vietnam War veteran, has chaired the ceremony each year in recognition of our nation's POWs, MIAs, and KIAs.

Hosey feels as he has for many years that we should "demonstrate a unified support and concern for all prisoners of war and missing in action."

The pledge of allegiance will be led by Cub Scout Pack 88.

Speakers will include members of the Fox Valley Chapter of Ex- Prisoners of War. The Table of Remembrance will be set representing all branches of the armed forces.

Explanation of its symbolism will be part of the remembrance prayer. The ceremony will conclude with the lighting of candles with members of the audience invited to come forward and light a candle.

More than 140,000 Americans have been prisoners of war since World War I. According to the Department of Defense's Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office, more than 88,000 Americans are still unaccounted for.

Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Jerry D. Jennings stated that the words "You are not forgotten" on the POW/MIA flag reminds us that we need to still work at bringing them home. …

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