Noise and Nuisances That Drive Us from the Capital

The Evening Standard (London, England), September 22, 2003 | Go to article overview

Noise and Nuisances That Drive Us from the Capital


Byline: ROSS LYDALL

FROM noisy neighbours and vandalism to the time it takes to get to work, they are the factors that make us love or hate where we live.

Now a major survey reveals that London is judged the worst for quality of life.

In a measurement of these key indicators, the capital was judged the least attractive of England's nine regions.

The South-East outside London is the fourth best overall but is joint worst with the capital for community spirit.

The East of England emerged as the best overall.

Together with the South-West, the East is also considered the best area for bringing up children, with London the worst.

Sue Ellenby, head of the London Housing Federation, said high property prices forced many Londoners to live miles from the communities they were brought up in.

"This often results in hours of commuting each day, limited leisure time and a lack of regular contact with those whom we are closest to," she said.

"The report shows that these are all contributing factors to people's unhappiness."

Other findings showed that in London and the South-East only 31 per cent of people talked to their neighbours most days, compared with almost half of residents in the North-East.

The survey was commissioned by the National Housing Federation to predict how the country will look by 2010, and why people may choose to move into or out of an area.

It predicts the largest population increases will occur in the South-West, South-East and East, followed by London and the East Midlands.

The need for a strong sense of community will grow as the traditional mainstays of modern life - a decent job, good home and relationship - become more unstable, its authors claim. …

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