Teaching Children Mathematics: A Resource for Teaching, Learning, and Sharing

By White, Dorothy Y. | Teaching Children Mathematics, September 2003 | Go to article overview

Teaching Children Mathematics: A Resource for Teaching, Learning, and Sharing


White, Dorothy Y., Teaching Children Mathematics


The Editorial Panel of Teaching Children Mathematics (TCM) welcomes you to Volume ume 10 and invites you to take an active role in our community of mathematics educators.

You may notice that TCM has a new look this year. We have spruced up our pages to make the journal more attractive and easier to read. Our commitment to bringing you informative and engaging articles, however, has not changed.

This spring, we will launch a new department titled "Supporting Teacher Learning." This department will serve as a resource for teacher educators in their day-to-day work with prospective and practicing teachers and will include articles that address issues related to pre-K-6 mathematics teacher education. In subsequent volumes, the department will become a regular feature of TCM and will appear four times a year.

Volume 10 will not include a themed focus issue as previous volumes of TCM did. This lapse will allow us to implement a new focus issue schedule in Volume 11. Look for the next focus issue, titled "Teaching Mathematics to Special Needs Students," in October 2004.

TCM is a resource for teaching, learning, and sharing that offers you many avenues through he which to grow profcssionally and contribute to the ur professional development of others. Every issue ad contains a bounty of interesting ideas to make teaching mathematics an exciting experience for you and your students. The journal offers you opportunities to learn from the experiences of others and to share your classroom ideas, experiences, and opinions with a wide audience.

Teaching with TCM

The articles in TCM are designed to promote mathematies teaching and learning with prekindergarten through sixth-grade students. Adapting the ideas that you read in the journal and trying them in your own classroom can give you new ways to approach the teaching of mathematics. The "Problem Solvers" and "Math by the Month" departments include problems and activities designed to appeal directly to your students. As your students problem solve and investigate mathematics, you and your students will gain insights and notice interesting outcomes.

Learning from TCM

TCM is committed to the professional development of teachers and provides opportunities to learn about current practices and trends in teaching mathematics to elementary students. You can use TCM to learn about innovative research and its implications for the classroom in "Research, Reflection, Practice"; mathematics-related Internet sites in "News from the Net"; and software, books, and other materials that support students' mathematical learning in "Reviewing and Viewing. …

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