A Scholar and Exile

Newsweek International, October 6, 2003 | Go to article overview

A Scholar and Exile


Edward Said's death last week could scarcely have come at a more poignant time. It's not that it wasn't expected: the 67-year-old Arab intellectual had battled leukemia for more than a decade. But it's a cruel cut that he died at such a dismal moment in the history of his two greatest passions--the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and the relationship between the Islamic world and Western powers. The Roadmap for Mideast peace seems as far from reality as the novels he taught as a Columbia University literature professor. And global stability has been threatened by religious fundamentalism and political extremists-- some, he would argue, residing in Washington.

Said had always been in exile from mainstream culture. Born in 1935 to a prosperous Christian family in Jerusalem, he spent most of his childhood in Egypt and Lebanon, followed by the United States, where he attended boarding school and Princeton University. In Cairo, the young Arab was steeped in Shakespeare and Beethoven. Later, living and teaching in the United States for four decades, he became an outspoken critic of America's media, government and foreign policy--an Ivy League professor speaking on behalf of Gaza's dispossessed. His criticism-- whether on literature, politics or music--insisted on culture as a gloriously complex, dynamic, muddled affair.

But his central themes were the politics of culture and the culture of politics. His most famous work, "Orientalism," argued that Western scholarship on the East was shaped by imperialism. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Scholar and Exile
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.