17-Year-Old's Future Plans Are Up in the Air

By Brandenburg, Susan D. | The Florida Times Union, October 1, 2003 | Go to article overview

17-Year-Old's Future Plans Are Up in the Air


Brandenburg, Susan D., The Florida Times Union


Byline: Susan D. Brandenburg, Times-Union correspondent

Southsider Jonathan Clark took his first flight when he was 10 months old.

Born with billiary atresia, a severe liver disorder, he was transported by Lear Jet to Children's Medical Center in Dallas for a life-saving liver transplant.

Jonathan's a healthy, active 17-year-old Mandarin High School junior now.

"And he's never stopped flying," boasted his mother, Hester Clark.

"From the time he could talk, Jonathan begged to fly," remembers his dad, John Clark, executive director of the Jacksonville Airport Authority. "Every toy turned into an airplane. He would even make airplanes from paper clips."

At 9, Jonathan began taking flight lessons at Detroit Airport. Since the Clarks moved to Jacksonville in 1997, he has spent many hours in the air over Craig Airport in Arlington as a student of Sterling Flight Training.

"Jonathan's very good on the stick," said his instructor, Donald Doan. "He's a natural."

Last summer, Jonathan soloed for the first time at the Summer Flight Academy in Houston sponsored by the Black Pilots of America, an organization dedicated to training African-Americans in various types of aviation employment. The group's chapters, such as the Atlanta Raptors, Memphis Blackhawks and Bronze Eagles of Texas, are made up of commercial airline pilots and other aviation professionals who volunteer their expertise at the Summer Flight Academy.

In September, Jonathan completed his first Jacksonville solo flight at Sterling Flight Center.

Although Jonathan's father was an air traffic controller in the U.S. Air Force and has been employed in the field of aviation ever since, it was his mother who found the BPA Web site while surfing the Internet for aviation camps for her son.

"There was a similar camp at Embry Riddle University in Daytona," said Hester Clark, "but Jonathan liked the idea of flying to Houston. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

17-Year-Old's Future Plans Are Up in the Air
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.