Pragmatic Trade Policies; the U.S. Needs Consensus

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 25, 2003 | Go to article overview

Pragmatic Trade Policies; the U.S. Needs Consensus


Byline: Gary J. Andres, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

If free trade were a feline, the fur would be flying after the collapse of the Cancun World Trade Organization's negotiations in Cancun. Many believe the demise of these talks was a serious blow to global trade liberalization, a harbinger of the growing worldwide muscle of protectionism. Yet, in the rough and tumble world of forging international trade agreements, U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Bob Zoellick knows one thing for sure - there is more than one way to skin a cat.

Mr. Zoellick has been a long-time advocate of pursuing a multifaceted and simultaneous trade liberalization strategy - including global, regional and bilateral agreements. He calls this strategy the "competition of liberalization." His approach is like a free-trade insurance policy - if one set of agreements stalls, we can pursue alternatives. "Bob Zoellick operates like a three-dimensional chess master in the international trade field," said Rep. David Dreier, California Republican. Rather than a dead end for free trade, Mr. Zoellick's post-Cancun plan and strategy means moving down different paths. This pragmatic approach promotes free trade at several levels.

First, securing regional and bilateral pacts gives the U.S. maximum leverage in broader global talks. This mutually reinforcing approach means better trade outcomes for the United States and more leverage at the bargaining table. "We all had high hopes for Cancun," said Mr. Dreier, "but even though progress on the Doha development round has been delayed for now, Zoellick's approach affords us the opportunity to advance our overall trade liberalization agenda through bilateral and regional agreements while we work to get global talks back on track."

Second, engaging in global, regional and bilateral negotiations helps maneuver around obstinate trading partners. One administration official suggested this approach could show real promise with countries like Brazil. "The Brazilians were a problem in Cancun, and they might be in the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas, but if they are, we are poised to deal with their neighbors - putting significant pressure on them to not get left out in the cold." Isolating Brazil from robust trading relationships hurts them, both in South America and globally.

Third, executing numerous bilateral agreements, when combined, can have as positive an impact on the U.S. economy as one big deal. Some academics questioned the significance of pursuing many smaller bilateral agreements. Yet, other evidence suggests the combined impact of these deals is significant. …

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