Matricula ID Controversy Grows; Nine States Now Issue Driver's Licenses Based on Mexican Documents

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 6, 2003 | Go to article overview

Matricula ID Controversy Grows; Nine States Now Issue Driver's Licenses Based on Mexican Documents


Byline: Audrey Hudson, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Nine states are accepting a Mexican government identification card as one form of documentation enabling its holder to obtain a driver's license.

California has come under the most criticism for accepting the matricula consular as a secondary form of identification. Idaho, Indiana, New Mexico, Oregon, North Carolina, South Dakota, Utah and Wisconsin also recognize the cards as either a primary or secondary document to obtain a license.

Every state assembles its own list of acceptable documentation to prove name, age and address.

A high school yearbook, newspaper clipping or church directory works in Idaho. Membership in the Hoosier Rx plan, a school report card or gun permit is recognized by Indiana. An adoption record - officially sealed - is accepted in Michigan. Wisconsin takes Canadian social insurance cards or prison-release documents.

But the common denominator among this hodgepodge of paper is that all are considered verifiable. That's opposed to the matricula consular card, issued by the Mexican Embassy and its consulates to its citizens living in the United States legally, and some say illegally.

In North Carolina, even a Mexican voter card or Mexican military card is an adequate form of identification to obtain a driver's license.

The American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) has issued a resolution calling it "premature" to accept the matricula consular card as a verifiable document on which to issue a driver's license.

Members of the AAMVA "expressed concerns that foreign consular IDs, including Mexico's matricula consular card, lack standardized issuance procedures, uniform security features and a secure database for verification purposes," the resolution said.

The Treasury Department recently ruled the matricula cards could be accepted by financial institutions, but federal law-enforcement agencies continue to express reservations about the card's validity.

Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge last month warned banks and local officials accepting the cards that "they do so at their peril. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Matricula ID Controversy Grows; Nine States Now Issue Driver's Licenses Based on Mexican Documents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.