Sticking to Hoops

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 6, 2003 | Go to article overview

Sticking to Hoops


Byline: John McCaslin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Sticking to hoops

The Democratic Party is having a difficult time recruiting a recognizable cast of characters to help retake control of the Senate.

The latest to say "no, thanks" is former U.N. Ambassador Andrew Young, who didn't let several months of courting from the Democratic National Committee sway him into seeking Georgia's open seat.

Other familiar faces ruling out senatorial bids in recent weeks are former Clinton Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman in Kansas, former Democratic presidential aspirant Gary Hart in Colorado, Lt. Gov. Joe Maxwell in Missouri, even Philadelphia 76ers general manager Billy King in Pennsylvania.

Jay Timmons, executive director of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, detects "minority party" disenchantment.

Base model

We've learned that 11 former commissioners who served on the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission (BRAC) have endorsed a new plan to apply the BRAC model to closing "stagnant" U.S. Postal Service facilities.

The plan was originally proposed this summer by a panel appointed by President Bush to consider the future of the postal service.

"Because of its vast and outdated infrastructure, the U.S. Postal Service would benefit from the same kind of dispassionate review that we applied to the Department of Defense," the former commissioners say in a letter to Congress.

The ex-commissioners include former Rep. Jim Courter, chairman of the 1991 and 1993 rounds of BRAC; former Sen. Alan Dixon, who served as the commission's chairman in 1995; and Arthur Levitt, former chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Bar sightings

That was Democratic presidential hopeful Richard A. Gephardt, wife Jane, and daughters Chrissy and Kate ducking into the popular Bar Rouge at Washington's Hotel Rouge, where in honor of the appearance a special "Gephardtini" was stirred up - a blue (?) martini, garnished with a bright red cherry.

Meanwhile, across the Potomac River, Al Gore enjoyed his privacy while dining with friends at Alexandria's Evening Star Cafe (he also poked his nose into the upstairs Majestic Lounge), mainly because few in the young crowd recognized the former vice president in their trendy neighborhood hangout.

And trying to watch his Chicago Cubs beat the Atlanta Braves while dining over the weekend at Old Town Alexandria's Landini Bros. …

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