Ways to Lift Profits in Shareholder Services

By Shatz, Jonathan | American Banker, June 12, 1991 | Go to article overview

Ways to Lift Profits in Shareholder Services


Shatz, Jonathan, American Banker


Ways to Lift Profits in Shareholder Services

Stock transfer services, commonly called the shareholder services business, are offered by financial institutions to corporate clients as a way of generating fees.

There are two areas in which a strong treasury department can make a major impact on the bottom line. First, by making the treasury staff an integral part of the sales and marketing team and, second, through sophisticated cash management.

Key financial staff should be viewed as part of the sales team. Clients react positively to the presence of a strong chief financial officer at presentations and client calls. It is a signal to the client that the management of the shareholder services company is united and pulling together, and that there is no culture gap between sales and finance.

First, some background: The shareholder service agent provides stock transfer execution services, keeps the shareholder and company-issued share capital records, and acts as the dividend paying agent.

Shareholder services is a mature industry and has low margins. And the companies who use these services see them as something to be endured in order to issue and trade shares.

The major providers are Bank of Boston, First Chicago Trust Company of New York, Mellon Bank, Chase Manhattan, and Manufacturers Hanover Trust.

Without some major consolidation in the industry, the providers are unlikely to significantly improve profitability by either increasing sales or by cutting expenses.

The market is fairly rigid, characterized by competition through intense price cutting and an unwillingness of clients to switch transfer agents.

The business is still labor and paper intensive. A typical major transfer agent company employs a thousand people, most of whom shift a large amount of paper in processing stock transactions.

Also, providers have to service two sets of clients: the company that issues the shares as well as the shareholders (there may be as many as 8 million on the books) who receive the shares.

This makes the operation more complex. It's also less profitable because, while absorbing the overhead of dealing with two parties, the provider agent receives fees only from the issuing company.

Providers have examined cost reduction techniques (which also invariably reduce revenues), employed external consultants, and evaluated automation as a way to improve performance.

All these measures have had limited success. Another way for transfer agents to get an edge on the competition is by having a skilled and aggressive treasury and finance department.

Also, clients like to be reassured that the provider agent has strong financial and operating controls in place -- for example, that the audit department performs operational risk reviews of the various business units.

This may be especially true if the provider is attempting to sell a particular product line. If an internal audit has been performed of the employee stock ownership plans area, client anxiety over the risk of the product may be allayed.

An effective treasury may help avoid difficulties arising from the stock transfer agreement, for example, where right-to-audit clauses are part of the arrangements.

These right-to-audit clauses allow the client send in its own internal auditors to examine the operating and financial records the provider maintains for that particular client. …

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Ways to Lift Profits in Shareholder Services
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