Wizards Continue to Learn Offense

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 12, 2003 | Go to article overview

Wizards Continue to Learn Offense


Byline: John N. Mitchell, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

GREENSBORO, N.C. - Washington Wizards coach Eddie Jordan saw this coming.

"How many did we get tonight?" Jordan inquired after his team committed 24 turnovers in Friday night's 103-83 preseason loss to Philadelphia at Greensboro Coliseum. "The effort is there. The physical effort is there. Is the mental effort there? That is the question."

Washington has turned the ball over 48 times in its last two losses, dropping its preseason record to 1-2. The Wizards' sloppiness with the ball also has contributed to poor shooting. Against Philadelphia, they made just 34 percent, slightly worse than against Toronto in the previous game.

Mostly because these games don't count yet, the Wizards aren't particularly concerned. Jordan said he anticipated turnovers would be a problem early in the preseason as the team strives to get a handle on its new offense.

"Are we going back to the drawing board? Not necessarily right now," Jordan said. "The effort is there, but we have to find a way to channel that energy to make the right play."

The Wizards will get a chance to correct the situation Tuesday, when they resume play at Memphis. However, the health of leading scorer Jerry Stackhouse is of more immediate concern.

Stackhouse had his ailing right knee - which is believed to be sore and at the moment and does not require surgery - looked at further by team doctors yesterday. He and team officials are considering having him sit out the rest of the preseason in the hope that he will be able to play when the regular season opens Oct. 29 in Chicago, but right now no one is giving any guarantees. …

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Wizards Continue to Learn Offense
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