Global Survey Reveals Religion a Bigger Priority Than Politics

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 17, 2003 | Go to article overview

Global Survey Reveals Religion a Bigger Priority Than Politics


Byline: Julia Duin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A first-ever worldwide poll on religious beliefs shows that religion outranks politics in importance to individuals and that people think politics, not religion, fuels violence.

Designed by the Zogby International polling firm and the University of Rochester's religion department, the survey is a rare attempt to obtain empirical data about global religious beliefs and practices.

"Religion is far more important to people than politics," said John Zogby, president of Zogby International. "Most groups acknowledge the possibilities of multiple paths to religious truth and the majority of communities surveyed do not associate religion with trouble, unrest and violence in their own countries."

What's unusual about the survey is the number - 4,388 - and breadth of the interviews, conducted from January through March this year in seven countries. Most of the interviews were conducted in person. The poll is available online at www.zogby.com.

Groups polled included Russian Orthodox Christians, South Korean Christians and Buddhists, U.S. Roman Catholics and Protestants, Indian Hindus and Muslims, Israeli Jews and Muslims, Saudi Arabian Muslims and Peruvian Catholics.

Included in the U.S. sample were self-identified born-again Christians, a third of whom said they were political liberals.

Religion is a "high priority" in the lives of more than two-thirds of the Israeli and Indian Muslims, Hindus, born-again American Christians and South Korean Christians, the poll revealed. But less than 60 percent of the Saudi Muslims, Israeli Jews, Buddhists and Russian Orthodox said religion is a priority.

The South Korean Christians polled as the most religious, and they, Muslims, Hindus and born-again Christians said they practiced their religion at least weekly. Muslims scored the highest in daily observance.

Those who practice their religion the least include the Israeli Jews, South Korean Buddhists and Orthodox.

The participants were presented with a series of goals, such as achieving economic security, spending time with family, being actively religious, being actively political, being well-educated, learning a valuable skill and traveling, and asked to rank them in order of priority. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Global Survey Reveals Religion a Bigger Priority Than Politics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.