Dyslexia Is a Hiding Place for Creativity; Once Written off by Many Schools, Dyslexic Children Are Increasingly Being Recognised as Possessing Special Talents. Education Correspondent Shahid Naqvi Meets a Birmingham Woman Who Believes That in Their Midst Lies the Creative Geniuses of the Future

The Birmingham Post (England), October 20, 2003 | Go to article overview

Dyslexia Is a Hiding Place for Creativity; Once Written off by Many Schools, Dyslexic Children Are Increasingly Being Recognised as Possessing Special Talents. Education Correspondent Shahid Naqvi Meets a Birmingham Woman Who Believes That in Their Midst Lies the Creative Geniuses of the Future


Julia Smith's big plan is to set up a centre in Birmingham to harness the 'hidden' talents of dyslexic children and turn them into the artistic masters of tomorrow.

The Midland theatre director is convinced they have special powers that often go ignored in mainstream schools.

Ms Smith, who has won rave reviews working with Birmingham's Repertory Theatre and has toured abroad, is currently looking for a Birmingham base for the project, which will be called the Creative Learning Centre.

'Talking to people who are dyslexic, I have been really inspired by them,' she said.

'They have developed other strategies to cope with the problems they have. It is almost like a sixth sense. There is a lot of intuition there.'

People with dyslexia have varying degrees of problems with spelling, writing, reading, working with numbers, putting things in order or following instructions. Studies and and anecdotal evidence increasingly indicate an association between dyslexia and artistic talent.

Research carried out at UK universities two years ago showed a prevalence of dyslexia among art students compared to those on less creative courses.

Famous dyslexics include the painter Leonardo Da Vinci, singer Cher, scientist Albert Einstein, celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, entrepreneur Richard Branson and TV drama writer, Lynda La Plante.

Ms Smith came up with the idea of tapping into the creative potential of dyslexic sufferers after teaching drama to a group of children with learning difficulties at Birmingham's University of the First Age.

'The process of working with them was easier than dealing with professional actors,' she said.

'There was an openness there and a willingness to want to try. In a way, a desire to show their own talent.

'By the end of the week they had produced and performed a brilliant 15-minute play at the Midland Arts Centre with music and choreography. At the beginning of the week they were all very shy and lacking in confidence.'

Ms Smith currently runs the West Midlands franchise of the Indirect Learning Centre (IDL) -a multi-sensory, computer-based learning system that is helping people with dyslexia overcome their problem -from her home in Smethwick. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Dyslexia Is a Hiding Place for Creativity; Once Written off by Many Schools, Dyslexic Children Are Increasingly Being Recognised as Possessing Special Talents. Education Correspondent Shahid Naqvi Meets a Birmingham Woman Who Believes That in Their Midst Lies the Creative Geniuses of the Future
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.