If You Can't Read 'Em ... Frame 'Em

By Schneider, Fred | Art Business News, October 2003 | Go to article overview

If You Can't Read 'Em ... Frame 'Em


Schneider, Fred, Art Business News


A customer approached me recently with an unusual problem. He is an avid collector of vintage books, which he displays within his home, Unfortunately, several of his more sentimental titles are in an extremely fragile condition, Any contact from rubbing, handling or even dust might ruin their appearance, He asked if there was a way to show the books without upsetting his current shelf display. My solution was to frame them, creating functional bookends to protect the beautiful old volumes.

Our first step was to decide on an appropriate arrangement. After doing so, I measured the book stacks to determine the frame size. In this case. I stacked and assembled the bookends using Framerica's Boxer moulding in a Dark Walnut Rustic Pine finish. The moulding was cut to a size of 9 1/2 by 19 3/4 inches, using two Nos. 92004, one No. 93004 and a cap of No. 91004, Each bookend measures 6 3/8 inches in depth.

After fitting each box with Plexiglas, I lined each with Crescent Black Core Matboard No. 6989 Raven Black (mounted onto 1/8-inch foam core).

The next step was to make a shelf for each bookend, which would serve to hold a second layer of books. To do so, I measured the inside depth and width of the shadow boxes to determine the appropriate shelf size--in this case 6 1/4 by 9 1/4 inches. To construct the shelves, I used Framerica's No. 72004 cut with the moulding turned vertically in the saw then joined so the outside diameter of the frames measured exactly 6 1/4 by 9 1/4 inches. …

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If You Can't Read 'Em ... Frame 'Em
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