Healthy Effects of Stable Marriages

Manila Bulletin, October 23, 2003 | Go to article overview

Healthy Effects of Stable Marriages


DR. Marcos Noland, a leading international economist from the US recently told several audiences in the Philippines that research has shown that the phenomenal growth of such tiger economies as Japan, South Korea and Taiwan after the Second World War cannot be attributed to the intervention of their respective governments through what is called industrial policy.

Serious economic research has shown practically no correlation between economic success and such interventionist policies as subsidies, protective tariff rates and investment incentives.

What then accounts for the success story of East Asia? Social scientists are increasingly attributing the East Asian miracle to the quality and quantity of human capital that the countries of East Asia accumulated after the postSecond World War baby boom that produced the so-called demographic dividend during the decades of the seventies and the eighties. This dividend is reaped by a country during the stage when its labor force is still growing faster than the retired force. Over and above this demographic dimension, however, was the Confucian culture common to the first tiger economies of Asia. The culture was based on the ethic of hard work and strong family ties.

It is worrying, therefore, to learn that some of these East Asian societies are being contaminated by certain Western practices that are undermining the very foundation of their society, the family. A recent article by Norimitsu Onishi in the International Herald Tribune (September 22, 2003) reports about the surging divorce rate in South Korea: Social changes that took decades in the West or Japan, sociologists here like to point out, are occurring in this country in a matter of years. In the last decade, South Koreas divorce rate swelled 250 percent, in keeping with womens rising social status. But it shot up even more after the economic crisis of 1997, which caused widespread unemployment and shook mens basic standing in the society and family, said Hwang Hee Bong, a deputy director at the Korean National Statistical Office.

In the US, where fifty percent of marriages end up in divorce, there is a great deal of soul-searching about the need to strengthen the institution of marriage. As reported in the Zenit News Agency, an article in the June 2003 issue of a publication published by the New York-based Population Council was replete with findings on the salutary effects on individuals and society as a whole of stable marriages:

Married people are less likely than unmarried people to suffer from long-term illness or disability, and they have better survival rates for some illnesses. A growing body of research also shows an association between religious involvement and improved physical health.

Getting married, and staying married to the same person, is associated with better mental health. Marriage is also associated with greater overall happiness. While the connection between mental health and religion is much debated, Waite and Lehrer state that studies are suggestive of a positive association between the two.

A large body of literature documents that married men earn higher wages than their single counterparts. Although the relationship between religion and earnings is largely un-researched, the article does note that religiosity has a positive effect on educational attainment, a key determinant of success in the labor market. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Healthy Effects of Stable Marriages
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.