Youth Councils Help Guide Teen-Friendly City Policies

By Davis, Lance | Nation's Cities Weekly, October 20, 2003 | Go to article overview

Youth Councils Help Guide Teen-Friendly City Policies


Davis, Lance, Nation's Cities Weekly


In many cities, getting advice on legislation from teens is as important as getting input from paid consultants and legislative aids.

In those cities, mayors' youth councils perform a vital function--keeping the city councils, department heads and other administrative bodies informed on how legislation will affect a city's youth.

Youth councils also provide opportunities for leadership, civic duty and community service, where teens and their peers take responsibility for planning and implementing programs.

"Young people are the leaders of tomorrow--but we need to encourage teens to get involved in government today. The goal is to involve teens in identifying the challenges that young people face, and having them be part of developing programs and solutions," said Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino.

Menino has advocated getting input from Boston's youth since taking office in 1993. He transformed the former Mayor's Youth Leadership Corps into a youth council that regularly meets with the mayor and agency heads.

"When Mayor Menino took office he said he wanted the youth council advising him on a regular basis and that he expected them to facilitate and run the meetings," said Patty McMahon, the youth council's coordinator.

Successful youth councils also help cities determine how legislation and policy will impact teens.

In Indianapolis, Mayor Bart Peterson used the mayor's youth council to determine how legislation that limits access to violent video games would affect the city's teen population.

"Mayor Peterson regularly met with the youth council to see if they thought this would be a fair ordinance and to determine the challenges he would face from the city's youth as he pushed this forward," said Doran Moreland, special assistant to Mayor Peterson and a youth council advisor.

"It only makes sense to hear directly from the city's youth before we pass ordinances that will affect them. These are issues that they will also have to live with," said Moreland.

Like the mayor's youth councils in Indianapolis and Boston, the Nashville Mayor's Youth Council is responsible for putting together an annual youth summit where high school students can meet with college advisors and career counselors, prepare for the ACT and SAT and discuss issues that affect them.

This year, Nashville Mayor Bill Purcell also gave the mayor's youth council a greater role in shaping municipal policy through the creation of the Youth Liaison program.

The program puts a member of the youth council on every city board and commission. Youth council members are required to write an annual report detailing what their board or commission did that affects Davidson County's youth.

Kelly Boyd, the youth council's coordinator, said the mayor wants the program to evolve to the point that the city's boards and commissions actively seek input from the youth council members before implementing policies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Youth Councils Help Guide Teen-Friendly City Policies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.