Restoring Iraq: The Japanese Approach: Sisira Edirippulige Comments on Japan's Role in Post-War Iraq Reconstruction

By Edirippulige, Sisira | New Zealand International Review, September-October 2003 | Go to article overview

Restoring Iraq: The Japanese Approach: Sisira Edirippulige Comments on Japan's Role in Post-War Iraq Reconstruction


Edirippulige, Sisira, New Zealand International Review


With the collapse of Saddam Hussein's regime, the focus of international attention shifted to the issues of Iraq's post-war governance and reconstruction. The time had arrived for the Japanese government to consider its role in post-war Iraq too. The way that events unfolded, Japan was likely to play a bigger role than normal, going beyond its traditional limitation to paying America's war bills.

The shouldering of Washington's war expenses by Tokyo has become almost an essential part of the bilateral relations between the two countries. In the post-Cold War world Japan has paid $13 billion to cover expenses in the multinational effort during the Guff War--equal to 20 per cent of the war's cost. In the aftermath of the American war in Afghanistan to combat al-Qaeda and its host Taliban regime, Japan provided $120 million for refugee aid, plus $300 million for Pakistan as part of Japan's two-year assistance programme. In addition, Tokyo pledged some $375 million from its official development assistance budget for rehabilitation and reconstruction in Afghanistan. However, as members of the international community prepared to assist Iraq's rehabilitation and reconstruction, Japan was determined to go beyond its traditional chequebook diplomacy.

Even in the early stages of the Iraq War, Tokyo expressed its commitment to the post-war reconstruction of Iraq. As the war began to wind down, Japan became more enthusiastic about taking up a role in the postwar reconstruction and rehabilitation process. As Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi stated on 19 April, 'We have always been prepared to take an active role in the reconstruction of Iraq after the war was over. We are now moving towards implementing that policy'. (1) Tokyo reiterated its commitment to provide financial support 'to rebuild a country ruined by wars and tyranny' while considering drafting a new law to overcome existing obstacles to acting freely in the post-war Iraq reconstruction. (2)

Immediately after Saddam's regime fell, Japanese Foreign Minister Yoriko Kawaguchi made a tri-nation visit to Europe. She met her counterparts in Britain, Germany and France in early April to rally international support for Iraq reconstruction. Japan has maintained that success in rebuilding Iraq will depend on international co-operation. Meanwhile at the G-7 finance ministers' meeting Japanese Finance Minister Masajuro Shiokawa pledged a quick and active role by Japan in humanitarian assistance, while emphasising the need to create an international framework for reconstruction efforts. In addition, during his visit to Baghdad in early May, Senior Vice Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi met the head of the Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance (ORHA), Jay Garner, and members of UN relief agencies and non-governmental organisations to discuss issues related to the rebuilding process. Finally, in his recent visit to the United States, Prime Minister Koizumi expressed his support and commitment to Iraq reconstruction and called on other nations to join the effort.

The Japanese government established an ad hoc task force, coordinated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs with the Ministries of Finance and Economy, Trade and Industry, to study how Japan could effectively get involved in the reconstruction and rehabilitation process. (3) At the same time, Japan came up with its own policy framework known as the 'five point policy on post-war Iraq reconstruction'. The policy stipulates

* sufficient involvement of the United Nations in efforts in planning and carrying out humanitarian rehabilitation and reconstruction assistance in Iraq

* maintenance of Iraq's sovereignty and territorial integrity

* establishment of a new administration by the Iraqi people

* encouragement of non-governmental organisations and the private sector to take part in the rebuilding process

* Japan's continued and uninterrupted involvement. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Restoring Iraq: The Japanese Approach: Sisira Edirippulige Comments on Japan's Role in Post-War Iraq Reconstruction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.