Pairing Off: Shopping Centers Partner Up with Sponsors to Generate Ancillary Income

By Goldberg, David | Journal of Property Management, September-October 2003 | Go to article overview

Pairing Off: Shopping Centers Partner Up with Sponsors to Generate Ancillary Income


Goldberg, David, Journal of Property Management


Shopping centers are turning to sponsorship revenue to increase the bottom line and remain competitive in a challenging marketplace. A sponsor-partner is usually defined as a company using the center as a conduit to reach consumers without directly selling a product. These non-retail partners use the center's common areas to showcase their wares, detail their services, distribute product samples and market their brands directly to the public.

That Was Then; This is Now

Not long ago, a shopping center might lease space to a local car dealer, who would simply park a shiny, new model there for a month or two. Other centers might have paid promoters to bring traffic-building events, such as children's entertainment or a celebrity appearance, to the center.

Today, many shopping center auto sponsorships feature state-of-the-art displays, high-tech communications and hands-on opportunities for test drives, promotions and other made-for-the-mall strategies. Promoters still bring major events to the center, but now property managers are more likely to be cashing checks than writing them. Promoters willing to pay to use shopping centers as centrally-located venues profit too by gaining a built-in audience and extended marketing capabilities.

Marketers are finding it more difficult to reach mass audiences through traditional media. To supplement or replace their traditional advertising, savvy marketers have had to explore other options such as out-of-home advertising, telemarketing, direct mail, product placements in television and movies, online advertising and sports and event sponsorships.

When these marketers see the shopping mall, they see a new marketing medium, a new landscape to deliver messages in a targeted, cost-effective way.

The Litmus Test

It's critical to find a balance between maximizing sponsorship revenue and preserving a carefully cultivated center environment. The key to creating this balance lies in a simple litmus test that can be applied to every prospective sponsorship or sponsored activity. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Pairing Off: Shopping Centers Partner Up with Sponsors to Generate Ancillary Income
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.