Cruel TV Shows Humiliating Pop Wannabes, Says Beatles Producer; Music Industry Legend Is Appalled at the Way Pop Idol Performers Are Treated

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), October 29, 2003 | Go to article overview

Cruel TV Shows Humiliating Pop Wannabes, Says Beatles Producer; Music Industry Legend Is Appalled at the Way Pop Idol Performers Are Treated


Byline: Dave Roberts

THE legendary Beatles producer Sir George Martin yesterday hit out at 'cruel' TV talent shows which set out to humiliate the contestants.

He despaired at the current trend for television programmes such as Pop Idol, which poke fun at young singers making their desperate bids for stardom.

Sir George, who has produced around 700 records and masterminded 30 number one hits, said there was as much ambition and talent today as when he started out in the music industry 50 years ago.

But he was appalled at the way performers seeking fame and fortune were being treated in televised competitions watched by millions.

Sir George, who is regarded as probably the most influential and prolific producer in music history, said, 'Television is unequalled for exploiting talent but it is awful to see people being pulled apart like that.

'Those programmes like Pop Idol are all about humiliation. We seem to like to see people being humiliated on television.

'Gareth Gates and Will Young seem to have done all right but you can bet that the people who are benefiting are not the ones in front of the camera; it is the people dishing out the criticism who are making all the money.

'I don't like to see such cruelty on television.'

He said Big Brother was another programme guilty of using the kind of humiliation to win ratings.

But Sir George, 77, conceded that the TV talent show was nothing new.

'Years ago it was Opportunity Knocks, so it has always been there,' he said.

It is not the first time that Sir George has criticised the entertainment industry.

Previously he had condemned the drugs culture and called on show business to clean up its act.

He said recently, 'Perhaps the record companies could of their own volition declare that they would not sign a new artist if they were known to be habitual users of drugs.

'What's more important? Is it the future of the country, the future of youth, or the bottom line?'

He said The Beatles knew he disapproved of their drug- taking and that the relationship was a bit like a teacher's with his class. The veteran music maker, described as 'the fifth Beatle', said the band Coldplay and its lead singer Chris Martin were examples of 'great talent' although success was still being gauged by whether an artist made it big in America.

'Look at Robbie Williams - he is very successful here but he still hasn't made it in America,' said Sir George. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cruel TV Shows Humiliating Pop Wannabes, Says Beatles Producer; Music Industry Legend Is Appalled at the Way Pop Idol Performers Are Treated
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.