Minder; (or How the Miss World Girls Couldn't Get into Trouble Even If They Tried)

Daily Mail (London), November 13, 2000 | Go to article overview

Minder; (or How the Miss World Girls Couldn't Get into Trouble Even If They Tried)


Byline: PAUL HARRIS

AS Miss England Michelle Walker strolls along the sun-kissed beaches of Full Moon Island, her shadow follows.

And even when the sun briefly disappears behind a cloud, the shadow remains.

Her name is Pauline, and she is one of the army of chaperones devoted to keeping the 96 Miss World contestants well away from unauthorised encounters with real life.

The girls have flown out to the Maldives to be filmed for the beachwear parade which will be screened as part of the final in the Millennium Dome on November 30.

Every time they leave their hotel rooms they are accompanied by one of the 16 chaperones, nicknamed 'shaps', whose job it is to make sure no whiff of scandal can arise.

Full Moon Island is a tropical paradise of white sand and palm trees, so it comes as a surprise to learn that some of the girls have nicknamed it Alcatraz, which apparently has a great deal to do with the intensity of their supervision.

When you see a shap standing outside the Ladies, you can be certain there's a Miss World contestant inside - and that she's had to seek permission to go.

Whenever pictures are being taken, the chaperone hovers.

One photographer found himself on the brink of having his security pass removed, amid accusations that he was taking below-the-belt shots.

In fact, he was merely focusing his camera. The chaperone took a note of his name and reported him to officials.

The fact that Miss World founder Eric Morley died the day before the girls flew out here from the UK has had little effect on the staging of the contest.

Julia Morley has effectively been running it since 1968 anyway, and was in regular contact from London this week after making funeral arrangements. The show must go on, everyone keeps saying.

Perhaps the formidable Mrs Morley's absence from the Maldives explains why most of the shaps - whom she personally interviews and recruits from all over the world - are so wary this year of putting a foot wrong.

In contrast, the girls themselves seem relaxed and confident, even though some of them are thousands of miles from home for the first time.

The badges they wear bear names from just about every page of the atlas.

Step forward Miss Estonia. Irina Ovtchinnikova is 21, has impossibly blue eyes, and wants to help children and build a school.

Without prompting, the blonde former gymnastics champion explains in perfectly-rehearsed soundbites that you can give a starving child rice, but the rice may be gone the next day and the child will still be starving.

Meanwhile Miss England has been whisked away for a swimming-pool photoshoot.

The unmistakable outline of Pauline, a shap recruited from Edinburgh, is omnipresent. In a rare moment of chaperone distraction, she discloses that the jobs are never advertised, but candidates recommended by word of mouth.

Many of the shaps have been regulars for years, and the money is good, especially if they speak several languages. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Minder; (or How the Miss World Girls Couldn't Get into Trouble Even If They Tried)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.