Bjork Sings of Favourite Things

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), May 21, 2000 | Go to article overview

Bjork Sings of Favourite Things


Byline: JASON SOLOMONS

Cannes films are provocative and boundary defying so they infuriate as many people as they delight.

There really is no telling where the affections of the jurors (chaired by Luc Besson and including Kristin Scott Thomas, Jeremy Irons and Jonathan 'Silence Of The Lambs' Demme) will lie after their gruelling filmathon of 23 films in ten days ends tonight.

In recent years, judges have been so frazzled that they have rewarded the last film shown. That would mean James Gray's The Yards ** stands a chance, but despite a strong cast - Mark Wahlberg, James Caan, Faye Dun-away, Charlize Theron - it fails miserably.

A family drama played out against corruption on New York's train network, it looks gritty and stylish. But Gray overcooks every line and cannot match the personal with the political.

Ken Loach is much better at it.

His Bread And Roses **** is an unexpectedly charming treatment of a janitors' strike in Los Angeles.

Making his first film in Tinseltown, it is typical of Loach to niggle the starry universe he has always shunned. His Hispanic cleaners invade a party at a big law firm and, as the union leader delivers his demands, the camera pans around the room to reveal Tim Roth, Ben-icio del Toro, Ron Perlman, Sam West and Chris Penn looking mildly amused at the disruption.

A popular though unimaginative winner would be the Coen brothers' O Brother, Where Art Thou? ****, a typically rumbunctious comedy based on Homer's Odyssey. A blind black man tells three escaped convicts (George Clooney, John Turturro, Tim Blake Nelson) that they will go on a long journey and see 'many startlements', including a cow on a roof. …

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