Soldiers on Style Front; as the Army Battles to Dispel the Stereotype of Military Women as Being a Cross between GI Jane and Private Benjamin

Daily Mail (London), July 27, 2000 | Go to article overview

Soldiers on Style Front; as the Army Battles to Dispel the Stereotype of Military Women as Being a Cross between GI Jane and Private Benjamin


IT IS physically gruelling, often humiliating, short on privacy and intolerant of femininity - in short, no place for a woman.

The Army has long since laboured under this possibly deserved public image.

But in recent months it has begun to fight back.

In an effort to dispel such stereotypes, the Army has agreed to allow BBC cameras into the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, to film Guns and Roses, a fly-onthe-wall documentary following the fortunes of a group of female officer cadets.

But what awaits the women who march through their passing-out parade?

The Scottish Daily Mail spoke to three female officers to find out why, with a world of freedom ahead of them, they opted for a regimented existence.

'I'M A Glasgow girl, born and bred.

I went to school in Glasgow, studied law at Glasgow University and did my traineeship in Glasgow 'The furthest afield I looked to be going was when I was offered a job in a legal firm in Falkirk at the age of 24 - so I suppose joining the army came as a bit of a surprise to everyone.

'It was my dad who gave me the idea. He saw an advert in a paper saying: 'Lawyers needed to defend their country.' I thought it sounded a bit of a giggle, so I applied.

'The selection process lasted three days and involved interviews and mental and physical exercises. When I learned I'd been accepted, I was thrilled and a bit daunted. I had no military experience. With my dad the manager of a grocer shop, my mum a pharmacist and my brother a corporate banker, there was no background experience either.

'The training I did at Sandhurst was pretty much the shortest officer training you get - the Professionally Qualified Officers Course. It's basically an introduction to the Regular Officers Course and lasts three weeks. You get a taste of army life and begin to understand what it's about.

'At the outset, I must admit I wondered what I could get out of three weeks - it seemed such a short time.

But it's intensive and very cohesive. I made friends on that course who I still have. It has certainly provided me with a lot of good memories.

'After that there is a training in military law, which lasts four weeks. In my first year of service, I did a three-month attachment with the First Battalion, Royal Regiment of Wales n Northern Ireland to give me a deeper knowledge of army life. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Soldiers on Style Front; as the Army Battles to Dispel the Stereotype of Military Women as Being a Cross between GI Jane and Private Benjamin
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.