Doctor Suspended for Prescribing the 'Chemical Cosh'

Daily Mail (London), January 21, 2000 | Go to article overview

Doctor Suspended for Prescribing the 'Chemical Cosh'


A CHILD psychiatrist has been suspended over fears that he wrongly prescribed hyperactive children with a controversial drug which has divided the medical world.

Dr David Foreman is believed to be the first psychiatrist in Britain to be suspended from duty over his prescribing of Ritalin, called the 'chemical cosh' by its critics.

Some 150 youngsters treated by Dr Foreman are having their cases reviewed amid concern they may have been wrongly diagnosed.

Ritalin has been seen as a miracle drug in the treatment of hyperactive children -but has also prompted serious concern about the long-term side-effects of its use, with alleged links to higher rates of smoking and drug abuse in later life.

Last year British doctors were warned to curb their use of the amphetamine-type stimulant.

Figures suggest that the number of children being treated with the drug in Britain shot up to 15,000 cases last year.

Last night North Staffordshire Combined Healthcare Trust said that following an internal review, it was re-examining the cases of the 150 children, aged five to 11 from the district, who had been diagnosed by Dr Foreman at the Abbey Hulton clinic in Stoke-on-Trent. A special helpline has already received around 40 calls from concerned parents. Their GPs have also been informed.

Dr Roger Bloor, medical director of the trust, said: 'A review of treatment procedures at Abbey Hulton clinic raised some concerns.

'Hyperactivity is very difficult to diagnose.

Nobody can claim to be 100 per cent accurate at diagnosing it.

'Calling in all the children is just a precautionary measure.

'It allows us to get a second opinion to ensure that all possible factors were taken into account when devising a care plan for a child.

'The parents we have spoken to are all happy with the situation.

'We have advised them to continue with the current treatment plan until the child is reviewed.' Hyperactive children - who suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - find it impossible to concentrate and are jittery, restless and compulsive.

But the diagnosis and treatment methods have divided doctors.

Ritalin is a stimulant which makes the body's 'feelgood' chemical more available in the brain. It has been widely successful in its treatment of hyperactive children.

Up to five per cent of boys and two per cent of girls are thought to suffer from the disorder.

The drug has also been linked with side-effects including depression, lethargy, loss of appetite, irritability and disruption of sleep patterns.

Some experts claim it is being used as a 'chemical cosh' to quieten difficult children.

In the U.S., the number of prescriptions is rocketing. One controversial study said youngsters who take Ritalin are more likely to smoke in adulthood and three times as likely to use cocaine.

Educational therapist Jean Robb, who runs a scheme on Merseyside called Successful Learning, believes a holistic approach is best for hyperactive children. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Doctor Suspended for Prescribing the 'Chemical Cosh'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.