Internet Voting Soon; Touch of a Button Polls Could Increase Turnouts

Daily Mail (London), February 5, 2000 | Go to article overview

Internet Voting Soon; Touch of a Button Polls Could Increase Turnouts


Byline: JAMES CHAPMAN

THE Internet could revolutionise voting at the next General Election.

Mobile phones, home computers and even games machines could enable people to get online and vote at the touch of a button.

The system is to be tested at local council elections in May and, if it proves successful, will be used at the next election.

Ministers believe that Internet voting will dramatically increase election turnouts by attracting younger people who find going to a polling station a turnoff.

Votes could be cast via the new generation of mobile phones - which offer Internet access - and games consoles such as the Sega Dream-cast.

Mobile Internet kiosks could also be set up in town halls, community centres and supermarkets.

However, the Conservatives last night accused the Government of 'gimmickry' and said Internet voting would undermine the democratic process.

Technology spokesman Alan Duncan said: 'I am totally and utterly opposed to any system that does not offer completely equal access to the voting booth.

'You can't have one system for a set of voters with access to the Internet and a different one for the rest. That's democratic unfairness.

It's yet another example of the Government turning the constitution on its head.' Critics fear the system could be breached by computer hackers trying to influence the result of an election or find out how people voted.

Traditionalists also worry that it will put an end to the trip to the ballot box and the thrill of the late-night count.

However, the firm behind the scheme - Entranet - claims that the system will be protected against hackers and says it will attract more of the electorate by giving a wider choice of where and when to vote. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Internet Voting Soon; Touch of a Button Polls Could Increase Turnouts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.