Deaths-Case Doctor Still Treats Women

Daily Mail (London), March 1, 1999 | Go to article overview

Deaths-Case Doctor Still Treats Women


Byline: EMILY WILSON

A BRITISH gynaecologist struck off in Canada after the death of a patient is finally under investigation in Britain.

The Canadian authorities banned Dr Richard Neale, 51, in the early 1980s.

But when he returned to this country in 1985, the General Medical Council refused to act against him.

It said it had no power to do so on the basis of events across the Atlantic.

Tonight's edition of the BBC1 programme Panorama, however, reveals that the GMC is now investigating the doctor, who is working privately in Leeds after being forced to leave two NHS hospitals in the past four years.

The programme includes an interview with Dr Eldon Lee, a senior gynaecologist who worked with Dr Neale at the Prince George Hospital in British Columbia in 1977. 'He was absolutely incompetent,' says Dr Lee. 'He was incapable of making reasonable decisions as to a patient.' According to Panorama, Dr Neale was stopped from operating at the Prince George after the death of a woman. He moved to Toronto. But in 1981, a patient died in childbirth.

A disciplinary hearing was told that Dr Neale administered a drug banned in the hospital and altered the woman's medical notes after her death. He was struck off.

After Dr Neale returned to Britain in 1985, Dr Andy Sear, a British doctor working in Canada, contacted the GMC to alert it to what had happened. 'They said they were aware but that having problems in another country did not preclude a doctor

from working in Britain,' Dr Sear tells the programme.

Dr Neale started work as a consultant gynaecologist at the Friarage Hospital in Northallerton, North Yorkshire. …

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