His Mother's Secrets Come Back to Haunt Bill Clinton

Daily Mail (London), January 5, 1999 | Go to article overview

His Mother's Secrets Come Back to Haunt Bill Clinton


Byline: IAN COBAIN

BILL CLINTON is haunted by his failure to discover his real father's identity, it was claimed yesterday.

With his Senate trial looming next week and fresh allegations surfacing about a dalliance with a prostitute, the President could have done without further controversy.

But now research into his family's past has suggested Clinton may have been conceived during one of his late mother Virginia's many extramarital affairs.

Clinton was christened William Jefferson Blythe in August 1946 , son of Bill Blythe, who died before his birth.

His name changed after Virginia married again - to a Roger Clinton.

According to next month's issue of the magazine Vanity Fair, Bill Blythe was serving in Italy with the U.S.

Army in November 1945, nine months before the future President was born.

Clinton's mother attempted to explain this, shortly before her death from cancer, by claiming the birth was induced four weeks early after she was hurt in a fall.

But midwife Wilma Booker, the woman Clinton describes as 'the first to spank my butt', has told Vanity Fair: 'I remember he was a nice-sized baby, between eight and nine pounds. He could not have been premature at that weight.' She added that Clinton's mother,

who once declared her son weighed 8lbs 6oz at birth, 'got kinda big while she was pregnant'.

Virginia, a hard-drinking gambler, once admitted she had been 'shameless' in her younger days, adding: 'It was wartime, and we talked fast, played fast and fell in love fast. …

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