A Mother Claims: I Was Raped by the President

Daily Mail (London), February 20, 1999 | Go to article overview

A Mother Claims: I Was Raped by the President


Byline: IAN COBAIN

THE scandal which has secretly terrified Bill Clinton for years burst into the open yesterday when claims that he raped a woman appeared in America's most respected newspaper.

He was said to be 'utterly dumbfounded' that the Wall Street Journal had published the allegations.

A successful Arkansas businesswoman, married with a grownup son, broke 20 years of silence to tell the newspaper Clinton had forced himself upon her.

Juanita Broaddrick, 56, says Clinton then calmly told her she did not need to worry about becoming pregnant because he was sterile after having mumps as a child.

'As though that was the thing on my mind.

I wasn't thinking about pregnancy, or about anything,' she said. 'I felt paralysed and was starting to cry.

The White House dismissed the claim as 'ridiculous' and insisted the President was

the victim of a vicious smear campaign hatched by his political enemies.

Clinton's aides pointed out that Mrs Broaddrick had once signed an affidavit denying that the rape happened.

But sources at the Journal responded that she did so during the Paula Jones sex harassment case, when other witnesses like Monica Lewinsky and the President himself lied under oath. Mrs Broaddrick later told investigator Kenneth Starr that her affidavit was false, and that she had, in fact, been raped by the man who was to become leader of the free world.

Last night deep despondency was settling on the White House which, seven days earlier, had been celebrating Clinton's acquittal at the end of the Senate sex-and-lies impeachment trial.

To examine this allegation, like so many others in Bill Clinton's life, it is necessary to look at events long ago in a small hotel room in Little Rock.

In the summer of 1978 Clinton was on the first rung of his political career, working as attorney general for Arkansas. One afternoon, campaigning for the governor's post, he visited a nursing home in town of Van occurred that night behind the door of Room 824 has been the subject of at least three secret inquiries, first by investigators working for Paula Jones' lawyers, then by the FBI, and finally by a woman police sergeant from Chicago on attachment to the House of Representatives judiciary committee.

At least one of the investigation teams concluded that the President was, indeed, guilty of rape and members of the other two teams heard enough to leave them unsettled. …

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