Grow Up, Faldo; Leadbetter Hits Back after Being Sacked by Letter

Daily Mail (London), September 24, 1998 | Go to article overview

Grow Up, Faldo; Leadbetter Hits Back after Being Sacked by Letter


Byline: MICHAEL MCDONNELL

NICK FALDO was told last night to start acting like an adult - by the coach who made him the top golfer in the world.

As their 13-year friendship dissolved into a bitter war of words, David Leadbetter, sacked without warning, said: 'Nick has a character flaw. He doesn't seem able to handle adult situations. He couldn't even meet me face to face after all that time to say he wanted a change.

'Instead, he just sent a note to my teaching academy in Florida, while I was in Japan. I don't even believe he wrote it because some of the phrases it contains Nick wouldn't use. Probably his manager did. But he definitely signed it.' Faldo blamed a breakdown in communication and said: 'David didn't turn up at the U.S. PGA championship in Seattle last month and I didn't speak to him for five weeks.' But Leadbetter explained: 'I wasn't at the PGA championship because my father had died and I needed to be with my mother. I thought Nick might have understood that.

'I don't think he has been as committed to his golf in recent years. There was a time when he would want to work for four straight hours.

'But more recently he just manages about an hour.

Either he has the children with him, or Brenna (his girlfriend) is there.

The old intensity has gone from him.' Leadbetter transformed Faldo into a world-class star and the most successful player in the history of the British game.

During their glittering partnership Faldo, now 41, earned six major titles and went close to several others. He held the top spot in the world rankings and was voted the 1990 American PGA Player of the Year.

Their alliance also made the former Welwyn Garden City carpet-fitter a multimillionaire.

Leadbetter himself became a millionaire in the process, with golf schools all over the world, and said: 'Don't get me wrong. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Grow Up, Faldo; Leadbetter Hits Back after Being Sacked by Letter
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.