Try the Temps' Route to a Permanent Job; Career Mail

Daily Mail (London), June 25, 1998 | Go to article overview

Try the Temps' Route to a Permanent Job; Career Mail


Byline: LINDA WHITNEY

BRITAIN'S booming economy is good news for those trying to make the jump from temp to perm. The number of temporary staff being offered permanent jobs has nearly doubled in just a year, according to statistics prepared for Career Mail by recruitment giant Reed Personnel Services.

'Temp to perm' conversions within the same company have risen by 47 pc, the research revealed.

Recruitment costs are always a headache for employers and with job shortages in many areas, recruiting permanent staff from people who start as temps allows them to 'try before they buy'. Most common sectors for temp to perm conversion are office, secretarial and admin jobs, according to Reed, but it's happening in other sectors, too.

'We've seen temp to perm work double in the past year,' says Brian Ross, managing director of Reinforcements, an agency specialising in shop work and fashion industry temps.

The message is clear: turning temp can be a great way to get a permanent post. But there are pros and cons to taking the temp route; both employee and boss get to know the truth about each other something the traditional recruitment interview can never guarantee.

'Experiencing an organisation as a temp gives you a real opportunity to find out about a company from the inside and get to know the people you will be working with,' says James Reed, chief executive of Reed Personnel Services.

However, temp jobs sometimes pay less than their permanent equivalents and temps lose out on many of the extra benefits that permanent jobs can bring such as holiday and sick pay, pensions and private health cover.

If you want to take the temp route to a permanent job, remember that usually you will need experience of the kind of work you want, as employers do not have time to teach temps the basics of the job. …

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